< Previous

Blue Cross Vs. Medicare

What are the differences between Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Medicare?

By aprilmoe from Pensacola, FL

Ad

Add your voice! Click below to answer. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!

August 5, 20090 found this helpful
Best Answer

One has to apply for Medicare and no you do not have to have Medicare or Part B nor do you have to have Part D. I'm on Medicare but I do not have part D. If you decide to go on Medicare you must apply 3 months before, or 3 months after you become eligible or you will be charged a penalty for Part B (out of hospital) if you choose later to get it.

I've been on Medicare for 3 years and found that Blue Cross, Blue Shield (in my case) was the very most expensive supplemental carrier around. I pay $122 a month (as a healthy, non-smoking individual) and for my piece of mine it's well worth every penny. When it comes to Medicare and supplemental policies you really have to do your homework and it's very time consuming. I just finished another round of research helping my brother who just turned 65.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
December 8, 20160 found this helpful

Hi all, I am an insurance agent in Oklahoma. A lot of the rules governing insurance differ from state to state as I'm sure you're aware. I just want to give my opinion. I come across a lot of people who have federal plans and, in my opinion, these folks would be better served to just get A,B and a supplement. Medicare, I've found, does an efficient job where it counts the most, in your wallet. Any other approach will cost you money with co-insurance costs relating to specific procedures and ailments. My advice; stay healthy, keep original Medicare, and get a good supplement, either F or G.

Ad

Then, every year, have your insurance agent review your rates and shop for lower premiums. Yes, supplement providers raise rates annually and it's your job, and yor agents, to keep those rates low and the only way to do that is to do a re-write every year or two. I had a client who had a supplement for ten years! Their rates had ballooned to around 700.00 per month!!! Now that's an extreme example, but we were able to lower their rates to under 300.00. That's a $5000.00 a year savings. It's not complicated. Don't make it so. Work with a broker who has access to several insurers and best of luck.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
July 17, 20170 found this helpful

I have blue cross blue shield at my job so when he applied to medicare 12 yrs ago they told us at SS to keep him on my insurance and they would give him Med part A well he has had open heart surgery/rehab and diabetes and every time I tell them at the drs office/hospitals they ask me why isn't it reversed and I told them why and they say never heard that so which is a better way for us

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
March 17, 20180 found this helpful

And your conclusion? I turned 65 a year ago & kept TXBCBS for her but my wife now turns 65 this month & thinking is it worth $6500 annually or just let her keep Medicare.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
August 5, 20090 found this helpful
Best Answer

You do NOT apply for medicare. Medicare will send you a mailing with the medic care cards about 3 months before you are 65. With the mailing you will have the option of declining part B. You usually don't have to pay for part A but have to pay for part B. In my case I have both A and B. I only pay for part B which is $1,156.80 per year.

Ad

I also have Blue Cross which is $87 per month. I do not have Plan D as I have CVS Caremark through my former employer for my prescriptions that offer me a big discount. I also get 20% off any regular health related CVS store brand items. I also have a dental plan through my former employer that gives me 50% off dental work. call Medicare at 1-800-486-2048 they will clear up your questions.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
September 15, 20130 found this helpful
Best Answer

If you are paying for health insurance it's because we will all eventually get really sick and pay a lot for health care (and "eventually" will be sooner than later, now that we are at the age of talking about being eligible for Medicare). So, it makes sense to keep both Medicare and some form FEHB, even if it's basic coverage. They complement each other by paying for benefits the other does not (regular Medicare doesn't pay for meds/FEHB can; Medicare pays fully for approved durable medical equipment/FEHB provides only partial coverage; Medicare covers some NH days/many FEHB plans provide no coverage, etc. Like all insurance, consider investing in what you can afford.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
March 20, 20180 found this helpful

My friend was on BCBS. When she turned 65, she got medicare . She was told she could keep both to take care of her medical bills care. However, anytime she went to DR or hospital she had enormous blls to pay. e would not let me check into it for her. After6byear she final let me. She was getting the same coverage for each. What ever was used first paid the 80 % and the other wouldn't pay anything/ BCBS should have put her on their supplement, or at least let her know that was what she needed.

Ad

I found her a good supplement and she dropped BCBS. Then they called and wanted to knw why she canceled. I told them. No apology or anything. And of course, they would reimburse her for what she over paid for 6 years. I reported them to the insurance commission

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
July 28, 20180 found this helpful

Weve checked with Medicare about DME (compression stockings). They told us that they do not cover them even with a prescription from your doctor.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
August 4, 20090 found this helpful

At 65 you are enrolled in Medicare. A few months before you turn 65 the government will send you a mailing. Plan A is mandatory. Plan B is optional. Plan A pays a portion of the hospital and Plan B pays a portion of the doctors bills.
Some folks decline the Plan B to their chargrin when they recieve big doctor bills.
Blue Cross is one of many insurance companies that offer a supplement insurance plan.

Ad


What Medicare covers is explained in their bulletin that every one recieves in the mail.
For more information on medicare go to www.medicare.gov or 1-800-633-4227.
For Blue Cross you should be able to find them in the phone book or at google.com

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
August 5, 20090 found this helpful

I agree with another. Consult with a good agent who deals with Medicare supplemental insurance carriers. I mentioned before that I pay $122 a month. I've with American National in the Plan F. All plan F's, by law, pay the same for procedures but monthly premiums can vary as much as a couple hundred dollars.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
August 6, 20090 found this helpful

In most cases, once you retire or are disabled, Medicare will be your primary insurance carrier. B/C & B/S, if you choose them, will be a secondary insurance, covering most of what the primary one fails to pay. The boundaries are clear, but may not seem to be if you are just starting to handle insurance and are not familiar with it.

Ad

To make matters worse, in some states, B/C & B/S handles all Medicare payments (in other states it's AEtna, or another company), so it can seem more confusing than it actually is.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
October 30, 20090 found this helpful

I've been carrying Federal Blue Cross Standard for several years with Medicare as primary. I've had numerous hospitalizations, and I've not had to pay one penny in co-pays. My prescription drugs are $65 a name brand or $10 or less for generic for three month's worth. I see where in 2010 the cost of Standard will be (my share) $175 a month whereas Basic would be $100. Would I get the same 'no co-pay' coverage with Basic or would that not pay the full share that Medicare doesn't pay? I can phone Blue Cross to get an answer (maybe), but I thought I'd see if anyone on this forum has a Federal Basic Blue and can tell me there experience with it.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
January 4, 20170 found this helpful

Hello me I just turned 65 and would like to know what I should do about insurance

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
March 31, 20180 found this helpful

Surprised - as an BC/BS health plan member, saw an aggressive effort by BC/BS to persuade people towards Medicare. Their site appears to be affiliated with Medicare - called and asked "we are not".
With 'baby boomers' coming of age - I imagine BC/BS are looking at higher claims - which I suspect have everything to do with the push towards Medicare.

NOW MY POINT: WHY - did not BC/BS consider - lowering the premiums for members of age [65] by IE. $75.00 per month - as long as WE enroll in Medicare part B - this way the major portion of the claims are paid by Medicare B - this way BC/BS only has to pay the nickel and dimes.
Apparently they want to STILL collect their high premiums from members remaining on the BC/BS program and let US also pay additional hard found money, for the premium for Med.B, to Medicare and let Medicare carry most of the burden.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

Add your voice! Click below to answer. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!

In This Page
< Previous
Categories
Budget & Finance Health InsuranceAugust 4, 2009
Pages
More
🌻
Gardening
🎂
Birthday Ideas!
📓
Back to School Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Instagram
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
Categories
Better LivingBudget & FinanceBusiness and LegalComputersConsumer AdviceCraftsEducationEntertainmentFood and RecipesHealth & BeautyHolidays and PartiesHome and GardenMake Your OwnOrganizingParentingPetsPhotosTravel and RecreationWeddings
Published by ThriftyFun.

Desktop Page | View Mobile

Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us

© 1997-2019 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Generated 2019/09/02 13:03:28 in 949 msecs. ⛅️️
Loading Something Awesome!