social

Grapevine with Small Grapes?

A grapevine with small grapes.I have grown a grapevine now for 4 years in my greenhouse. The root is outside the greenhouse, the vine is inside the greenhouse. All I get is bunches of small pea size grapes, very sweet but a lot of pips. Have taken advice over the years; pruning, thinning, feeding, watering, training, etc. But it is the same. I'm about giving up on it now. Gave it my all. What can be the problem with this vine, is it just a runt? Help!

Advertisement

Add your voice! Click below to answer. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!


Silver Answer Medal for All Time! 320 Answers
December 1, 20211 found this helpful
Best Answer

It's frustrating to try garden tips to no avail! You didn't mention soil, so I'll add here that too much nitrogen could be a culprit. However, assuming your grapes are Thompson, I'll venture that expectations are possibly not realistic. Industrial farmers use gibberellic acid (a synthetic plant growth regulator, i.e. hormone) to increase size and therefore marketability of table grapes -- this not available to home growers.

Reply Was this helpful? 1

Gold Post Medal for All Time! 677 Posts
December 1, 20211 found this helpful
Best Answer

Make sure you are pruning the vine after the growing season is over. Letting the vine grow wild can be the cause of small grapes.

Reply Was this helpful? 1

Bronze Feedback Medal for All Time! 131 Feedbacks
December 9, 20210 found this helpful
Best Answer

You do not grow the same type of grapevine and you do not grow a grapevine the same way if you want to have, big beautiful grapes to eat, grapes to make good wine, or if you want the grapevine to grow over an arbor. But in any case you should not grow a gravevine inside a greenhouse. The grapevines that produce wine are not good to eat. On a wine grapevine for the winter season we cut off all the branches and in the spring, out of the new branches starting from the floral buttons we leave only one branch or two branches at the most to grow along a wire and that's all. The grapevine that produces good quality wine is not left to climb it is maintained horizontal, it must receive all the nutrients and the whole field must receive as much sun as possible, that's why the plants are facing south in a slope to have no shadow. By law the grapes are picked up at a given time not earlier not later and for the grapes to receive as much sunlignt and warmth as possible we take off the leaves. In France it is forbiden to water the wine grapevines. It means that to make good wine you grow only a few grapes on the same plant, you do not water it to concentrate sugar as much as possible and you give it as much sun as possible.

Advertisement

If your grapevine is a wine grapevine and you make it grow as many grapes as possible you will only have smallgrapes with nearly no taste and that will not be ready before falls (october). I your vine is made to produce table grapes it is the same if you want the kind of beautiful grapes you find in shops then you will have to make your vine produce only very few grapes. In the great grape yards like Bordeaux, côtes du Rhône, or côtes de Beaune each grapevine is kept as old as 50 years, because the less you wornout the plant the best the grapes will be. That means that to find out the right way to treat your grapevine you have to know which type it is because you will never get grapes delicious to eat if your vine is a wine grapevine. Here are the names of the tables grapes grapevines: the dark blue grapes : Alphonse Lavallée, Cardinal, Prima, Lival, Muscat de Hambourg and the white grapes ones : Ora, Danlas, Chasselas, Centennial. Hope this helps !

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

Silver Post Medal for All Time! 267 Posts
January 5, 20220 found this helpful

In the U.S., we commonly see Thompson (Sultana) green grapes and Concord dark blue grapes sold as table grapes. There are probably other kinds too. I believe that nearly all our grape juice is made from the Concord variety.

Advertisement

No idea if they are related to the French grapes or are indigenous to North America.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

Silver Answer Medal for All Time! 440 Answers
December 23, 20211 found this helpful

The most popular choices of grape vines to grow in a greenhouse are Thompson's Seedless, which produces a seedless green grape, and the Black Hamburg, which produces a larger, darker grape.
Perhaps you have Black Hamburg. You need to check if you comply with all the growing conditions:
Sunlight
Grapes need full sunlight or light shade throughout the day. They will grow best when placed in a sunny greenhouse.
Greenhouse vines should be planted at the opposite end to the door, with the stems trained along the side of the greenhouse parallel to the ridge of the roof and running towards the door.

Advertisement

Watering
Grapes need a thorough watering once every week to 10 days in the growing season. Where the roots are outside the greenhouse, be guided by the weather and concentrate your watering in dry spells.

Fertilizer
When growth starts in the spring, feed every three weeks with a high potassium feed, such as tomato fertilizer. Applying the fertilizer so that each plant gets about 1 pound of nitrogen each year is ideal. A potassium-rich liquid feed to encourage flowering and fruiting in various plants, not just tomatoes. Take care to follow the instructions on the packet.
Once the vine is in full leaf, increase this feeding to weekly intervals. When the grapes start to ripen and color up, stop feeding with tomato feed, as extra feeding at this time may spoil the flavor of the fruit.

Advertisement

Mulch
Just before growth starts in the spring, mulch the rooting area with well-rotted manure. During the summer, it is a good idea to mulch the greenhouse borders with straw to keep the atmosphere dry. This will aid pollination of the vine flowers and subsequent fruit set.

Reply Was this helpful? 1
December 24, 20210 found this helpful

Gardeners who live outside of 6-9 zones can grow grapes indoors in a greenhouse.
There are several reasons for grapevines producing small grapes:
not enough water during fruit maturation,
over-fertilization,
cool summer temperatures,
a short growing season.
Give grapes a chance to grow larger and to get more plant nutrients and water per grape by shortening the cluster. Take off the bottom half of the cluster, leaving four to five side branches near the top. Since these branches grow sideways from the cluster's main stem, they have room to hold fruit without crowding.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Advertisement

Add your voice! Click below to answer. ThriftyFun is powered by your wisdom!

In This Page
Categories
Home and Garden Gardening Growing Growing FoodDecember 1, 2021
Pages
More
💘
Valentine's Ideas!
🎂
Birthday Ideas!
🍀
St. Patrick's Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Instagram
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
Categories
Better LivingBudget & FinanceBusiness and LegalComputersConsumer AdviceCoronavirusCraftsEducationEntertainmentFood and RecipesHealth & BeautyHolidays and PartiesHome and GardenMake Your OwnOrganizingParentingPetsPhotosTravel and RecreationWeddings
Published by ThriftyFun.
Desktop Page | View Mobile
Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us
Generated 2023-01-23 12:32:51 in 4 secs. ⛅️️
© 1997-2023 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
https://www.thriftyfun.com/Grapevine-with-Small-Grapes.html