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Transplanting a Climbing Rose Plant

Category Transplanting
Red Climbing Roses
When your climbing rose is not growing well where it is currently planted it may be time to move it to a better location. This is a guide about transplanting a climbing rose plant.
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By 0 found this helpful
September 23, 2008

How and when can you move (transplant) a climbing/trellis rose bush? I don't know the name of it, but it has beautiful, bright magenta roses about the size of a tennis ball when it blooms. We have it at the end of our house but want to move it in order to pour a patio. Any advice is much appreciated!

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Hardiness Zone: 7b


Leah from Shelbyville, TN

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
September 23, 20080 found this helpful

I've grown roses around my patio and yard for many years, and what I've found, for the most part, is that roses are a lot like weeds: they are far harder to kill of than one might think!

I have a tendancy to "fly in the face of convention" when it comes to transplanting stuff, especially my roses because they are so cheap to replace. I just transplanted a climber from my patio to my back yard in the last 4-5 weeks, and according to the "experts" this isn't the "right" time. As of a few days ago, it's got new growth all over it, so what do they know? ~;0)

If it were me, I'd go ahead and do it. Make sure that the area to be transplanted is ready with a HUGE hole (wide AND deep) and lots of great new organic soil/fertilizer combo.

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Dig out a HUGE area surrounding the base of the bush so as to get as much of the roots as possible w/o thacking them up, and transplant so that the root "ball" is below the soil surface. Pack the soil well around the roots, making sure the bush is very stable. Water well and keep it moist but not soggy. Then, WAIT.

Don't take it out even if it looks like it's a gonner. Roses will almost always surprise you by coming back. If not the 1st season after transplanting, then the next one.

During the normal Spring/Summer months when flowering should be present, be sure and feed it. I use a simple granular systemic that I sprinkle around the base of the bush. It's easy, quick and gets into the bush from the roots as I water the plant.

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