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What Is This Plant?

I am wondering what this delightful plant is. A friend of mind gave me a cutting. She had it growing in her bay window. It was trailing with a woody type stem from a pot, and there were clusters of green, like in the picture, spaced out on the woody trailing stalk or stem. The cutting is rooting easily in water, it already has roots after only 1 week from being cut. My friend also did not know what this plant is. She has had it for many years. Thanks all!

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February 3, 20210 found this helpful

This looks like a corn plant to me. Mine is over 30 years old.

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February 3, 20210 found this helpful

I am going to go with Hawaiian Ti Plant- which is in the Cordyline Plant family. It is a tropical plant , that is a indoor or outdoor plant. -www.etsy.com/.../hawaiian-tropical-ti-plant-cordyline.... - and some history - en.wikipedia.org/.../cordyline

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February 3, 20210 found this helpful

You are saying a trailing stalk...I am not understanding what that looks like. The leaves may be part of the Dracaena family, one of which is called a "corn plant" but they don't trail....not like ivy. They grow like trees.

There are a large number of Dracaena varieties...so there may be trailing one. If you can find one that looks like the mom plant, that will confirm it for you.

Post back for with an update! Thanks!

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February 3, 20210 found this helpful

If the leaves are fairly thick and quite stiff/firm, it could be a Hoya, also known as Wax Plant. New cuttings start as a rosette of leaves, and gradually grow a woody vining stem that will get clusters of waxy flowers. I have two Hoyas, one gets white flowers with a tiny yellow spot in the center, and the other is a pale pink with a darker pink in the center. I keep mine growing in a west-facing window, and they do very well there. They don't require a ton of water, and I let mine dry out for 3 or 4 days before watering again....over watering can kill them from rot. When I water mine, I hold the pot over a large plastic bucket and give them enough water so that it runs through the soil. When it stops, I put them back on the window sill. Keep in mind that as the Hoya grows, the vine will need a trellis to climb. When mine got big and started to vine, I transplanted them into ceramic pots that had attached saucers, where I could anchor a heart-shaped wire form I made from coat hangers. Hoyas really are very easy plants to grow.

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Home and Garden Gardening House PlantsFebruary 3, 2021
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