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Making Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

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Using foaming hand soap is a great way to get a quick effective hand washing. It can get expensive if you use it often, especially with children in the house. This is a guide about making homemade foaming hand soap.
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By 5 found this helpful
December 15, 2008

Instead of buying foaming soap refills, try this: Buy one container of foaming hand soap. When it's empty, refill with 2 Tbsp. liquid hand soap for every 1 cup water. So simple, so easy, and cheaper. I haven't tried this yet, but I'm thinking the same recipe should work for foaming dish soap. I'll try it when my refill soap runs out.

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October 8, 20100 found this helpful
Top Comment

This is not a good idea. Manufacturers already use the least amount of active ingredients possible to achieve the desired effect of liquid soaps: cleansing, moisturizing and killing bacteria. There is no reason for them to use excess ingredients since it costs more. Diluting so much is excessive, and none of the ingredients will work as intended.

Worst of all, it's dangerous if you're talking about antibacterial soap. The liquid soap contains the minimum amount of triclosan deemed effective for killing bacteria. When weakened, much of the bacteria survive. Most, of course, wash down the drain but some aren't. These can then breed into triclosan-resistant strains through the Darwinian process of Natural Selection. That's not good for you, your family or society. See CDC statement below.

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Think about it this way: when you're given antibiotics, you have to take it for the full time prescribed. Stopping early risks changing the organisms into a resistant strain, which will reproduce and is bad for the patient and the rest of society. That's essentially what you're doing when you dilute the soap; you are using a weakened form of triclosan. As they say, "What doesn't kill you will make you stronger." And what doesn't kill the bacteria will make it stronger.

This is precisely the reason some health officials say that antibacterial soaps are actually harming society, by breeding resistant bacteria. By using diluted antibacterial soaps, you're making the problem even worse. If you must dilute the soap for financial reasons, use industrial or professional strength antibacterial soap. The soap in my lab, for example, has twice the amount of triclosan, and is made by Dial.

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A simpler solution is to not use antibacterial soap, but you'd still have diluted ingredients. The best solution is to not dilute soap at all.

Here is the CDC's official statement.
www.cdc.gov/.../levy.htm

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October 12, 20120 found this helpful
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When my foaming hand soap dispenser is gone I just use our dish soap to make more. The ratio is 3 parts water & 1 part soap. It works just like foaming hand soap.

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September 28, 201110 found this helpful

Just remember: do not use soap that is antibiotic; when it gets into our water it kills anything that grows. Also it apparently doesn't work; it has to be on your hands much longer than the time you spend washing them.

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By wggmn3

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By 6 found this helpful
June 23, 2016

You only have to buy foaming soap once! What makes the soap foam is the bottle, not the soap itself. Save your bottle and refill it with your choice of soap. What I do is dilute unwanted shampoo or soap/body wash. I start with 1/3 of the soap, then add water. If I want a thicker soap, I can then add more, but it's usually not necessary.

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June 26, 20160 found this helpful
Top Comment

It's the pump that makes the diluted soap foam.

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By 1 found this helpful
November 25, 2013

In the days of counting pennies, this will help if you buy the hand soap pumps like I do. Once that pump is empty, I make my own for pennies using 1 Tbsp. dish soap (any kind will do), and 1 tsp. of bleach. Fill slowly with water and shake gently. You have a great hand soap that kills germs for pennies, compared to buying new pumps or the refills for them.

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Editor's Note: Many dish soaps contain ammonia, which should not be combined with bleach. Be cautious as this can create a toxic gas that could be harmful or even fatal.


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September 27, 20140 found this helpful
Top Comment

Actually I work in food service and soap kills bleach. We are told by the health department to wash the dishes then rinse in clear water then sanitize... that's the reason for triple sinks in restaurant kitchens. Soap kills bleaches effectiveness. So adding bleach to your hand soap will not make it antibacterial.

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December 7, 2006

Foamy Hand Soap From Bubble Bath. My son is always adding water to my soap dispensers. He thinks they are toys, I guess. One day, he poured bubble bath into my empty foamy dispenser and added water.

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Nothing came out, but I decided to try to add more water and (viola!) I had foamy hand soap.

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Questions

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By 0 found this helpful
February 2, 2010

How do I make foaming handwash?

By pam kitchens from GA

Answers

February 2, 20100 found this helpful
Best Answer

You need to have the pump container that makes the soap foam. Put about one inch of shampoo or body wash into the empty bottle, then add warm water. Don't fill to the brim, leave some room at the top. Put on the top and shake very gently, turning back and forth slowly a few times. Works like a charm for pennies.

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February 8, 20100 found this helpful
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If you don't have the foaming container, buy one that already has foam soap in it. When that is finished, make your own with any liquid soap, shampoo or body wash.

The ratio of soap to water depends on your preference, and the strenth of the soap. However, 40/60 or even 30/70 is adequate.

It doesn't have to be antibacterial. Recent studies have shown that you just need to get stuff off your hands, and not necessarily by antibacterial agents. Let your man know that foam is just as effective to wash with.

Since it washes off faster, you'll save on your water and heating expense with foam. RVers and campers will appreciate this feature. A plus in drought-affected areas also,

If you want antibacterial agent, use antibacterial lotion or liquid.

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December 18, 20040 found this helpful

A short while ago there was a tip for making a foaming hand wash. I did not copy this and now I'm asking for a request. But I also want to wish each and everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Rudy from MA

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December 19, 20040 found this helpful
Best Answer

Was it this one??

www.thriftyfun.com/tf111862.tip.html

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By Lori (Guest Post)
January 9, 20050 found this helpful
Best Answer

www.readersrequest.com/tf869652.tip.html
this is one for making a handsoap to put in a pump.

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By 0 found this helpful
April 22, 2018

Can you make foaming hand soap from the regular bar soap?

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May 6, 20180 found this helpful
Best Answer

I put the bits and pieces of used bar soap in a mason jar with water, let that set for awhile, and then refill my other liquid hand soap containers, some foaming and some not. I've found that adding a little bit of dishwashing soap like Dawn keeps it from getting slimy. Or you can buy a cheap bottle of refill liquid hand soap and add a few squirts to each container and the Mason jar every so often.

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August 30, 20110 found this helpful

I am making foaming hand soap from a solid goat's milk base with added water. My soap bubbles with the foaming pump rather than foams. What can I do?

By Linda K.

Answers

August 30, 20110 found this helpful

Wow, I've never heard of such thing. Good luck with that one, bud.

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February 2, 20100 found this helpful

I would love a healthy way to make my own foaming hand wash. My daughter is OCD and washes her hands constantly. I am going through hand wash like crazy. I would like to save a few dollars on this one. Thanks. I'm new and can't wait for your response.

Terry from Fall River, Nova Scotia

Answers:

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

You can use any liquid soap that does not have moisturizers in it, because it will clog the pump. The 5 water to 1 soap ratio is about right. I just guess when I fill mine. It is easier when you add the water first, and then the soap, I have done this for years. (01/30/2007)

By Jazzylazzy

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

I think the most cost effective way to make soap is to find a good soap making supplier and make your own from scratch. If you use any bar soap, you can get melt and pour soap for about $2.50 a pound, a few cute molds and you have some really cute soaps. You can add fragrance and colors as well.

It would seem to me that if she is washing her hands constantly, you would need a soap with a moisturizing affect instead of alcohol which is very drying. I was reading today about the problems of the antibacterial soaps killing off good bacteria too, so you might take into consideration of getting rid of the antibacterial soap.

You can get some really moisturizing melt and pour soap bases and tons of ideas for making wonderful soaps. Adding a little toy, or surrounding a rubber ducky with soap. You will be surprised at all the molds and things you can do with the glycerin/melt and pour soap. Melt and Pour is easy to use. Get the chunk and cut it up into a bowl, stick it in the microwave until melted, allow to cool, and add fragrances and coloring. Pour into your molds and you are officially a soap maker.

Some places to look:
alcasoft.com
candleandsoap.about.com
wholesalesuppliesplus.com
soapersmarket.com
creative-wholesale.com

These are only a few of the links I have. You can find more by doing searches for soap making supplies. You will be amazed at how many soap makers there are out there making a living making soap.

For her condition, I really would recommend a moisturizing soap, no alcohol and naturally scented with Lavender Essential Oil, known for it's relaxing properties. I have used it to help me fall asleep by rubbing a drop on my temples.

If you need any more links, or help, I can point you in many direction. I am the printer for the Texas Candlemaker's Conferernce, texascandleconference.com and meet a lot of suppliers for soap and candles, essential and fragrance oils, and aroma beads. So if you need something please email me.

Please think about getting rid of the antibacterial soaps and alcohol and research shea butter soaps.

Sincerely.

Tina (01/30/2007)

By Tina Brown

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

And if you need to clean the soap scum out of your foaming dispenser periodically, when you finish a batch of soap rinse with clear water, then fill with a bit of vinegar and lots of water, and send the whole thing through the squirter. It won't foam, but it cleans out the inside where you can't get, and your dispenser will work longer.
(02/01/2007)

By Denise

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

This suggestion is not as frugal as the others, but it is tried and true. You can buy a Suds Pump from Pampered Chef. Go to pamperedchef.com and then choose your country, then go to products, then kitchenware and search for The Suds Pump. It only costs $9.00. (02/02/2007)

By Sarah, IL

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

I use Dr. Bronners soap in a 1 ounce Dr. Bronners to 5 ounces water. I got a dispenser I can refill for my shower at foamair.com Lasts a long time between fillups. The kids just love to get clean now. Thanks for all this wonderful information. (06/11/2008)

By Betsy

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

The ratio of water to liquid hand soap is more than 5:1. I tried that ratio and still found it to be too thick. I found that 7:1 to 10:1 works much better. I appreciate the idea of cleaning the foaming mechanism with vinegar and the idea of mixing the diluted soap with alcohol to enhance its antibacterial action. Bleach is incredibly antibacterial, but it's so corrosive that any metal parts in the mechanism would suffer an early failure. (07/25/2008)

By Jim

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

I have actually made something like this; all I did was fill a water bottle with water 94% and soap 6% and shake for 30-40 seconds. Then just put it carefully in any soap dispenser. (08/31/2008)

By Mark

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

Another option is buy a "Kandoo" soap bottle and use it up, then peel off the labels and use the ratios for your own soap. It's wider bottom makes it sturdier for kids and it's cheaper than the Pampered Chef version. (09/28/2008)

By Lisa

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

1 quart water to 2 T liquid soap. (11/15/2008)

By Christy

Homemade Foaming Hand Soap

I use dish washing liquid to make my foam soap. A few spoonfuls and the rest water. This place sells the same bottle and foamer as Pampered Chef for 1/10th the cost. bottlesandfoamers.com (01/07/2009)

By Gina

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January 30, 20070 found this helpful
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August 5, 20050 found this helpful
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