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Freezing Corn

Category Vegetables
Freezing Corn
Whether you dealing with a bumper crop from your garden or there was a great deal at the super market, freezing your extra corn will ensure you have some to add to meals later when you need them. This is a guide about freezing corn.
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July 8, 20108 found this helpful

I just got finished cutting some corn off the cob and thought I'd share my thoughts on that. I have gotten to the point where, when it is on sale, I buy a few more ears of corn than we can eat at one time and cut it off the cob to freeze for later. I do this several times a summer.

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After it is boiled, when it has cooled, I get a sharp knife and a paper or foam plate that I can use to pour or scoop the corn into a zip freezer bag. Quart bags are the best size for our family. I have found that cutting the corn from the point down is a better way than the other end up. When the corn is off the cob, I take the knife and scrape the cob to the plate so I can get all the good off the cob. If adding salt, pepper, or butter, wait till ready to eat.

Next there are several things you can do. You can squeeze out the air and freeze or save for another meal. Or you can add some of the water that the corn was boiled in to avoid freezer burn, then squeeze out the air. You could also put the cobs back into the corn water and boil for more flavor, then use the corn water to water pack the corn for the freezer. That more flavorful corn water can also be used in soups or stews and can be frozen separately for added flavor to other dishes.

The water packing and squeezing the air out will help keep the corn good for a very long time. I've found corn in the back of the freezer that had been there more than a year and it was in great shape. It didn't have any holes in the bag and tasted great. When ready to eat the corn, you can pour off the water packed broth, heat it with corn, or dump the whole bag into a pot of home made soup. Tastes great in the winter. .

By Squeeky from Western PA

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By 9 found this helpful
April 10, 2011

This may be a little early in the season, but as I used the last of my corn from the freezer for dinner tonight, it reminded me to share this with everyone. Over the years, I have tried many times to freeze corn on the cob. Most instructions say to blanch and cool. But we didn't like the "off" flavor that method imparted. I think I have found the perfect, and also the most simple, way. And the end result is corn on the cob from the freezer that is as good as from the garden!

Just take your ears of corn as you pick them or as you bring them from the market. Do not remove the husks or the silks. Don't even strip them down. Just cut the sharp end off the bottom of the ear just below the cob. Wrap each ear separately in plastic handi-wrap and pop them into the freezer. They do not have to be bagged. I have a wire basket to keep them together.

When you are ready to use them, remove the plastic wrap, leave the husks intact, and lay them, a couple at a time, in the microwave. We are a family of two, so I do two ears in the microwave at high power for 10-12 minutes. Carefully, using potholders, pull the husks off and brush the silk away. Dress them up with a little butter and salt. YUM! Tastes like fresh from the garden!

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By Harlean from Arkansas from Hot Springs, AR

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By 1 found this helpful
June 16, 2006

Selecting High-Quality Corn:

Corn should be harvested for freezing in the "milk stage" (as soon as the kernels are full of sweet, milky-colored juice). If the fluid in the kernels is clear, the corn is not ready yet. Try to process the corn a quickly as possible after harvest, before its natural sugars start turning to starch. Purchased corn should be kept refrigerated while being sold, if it's not, reduce storage time accordingly. Husks should be green, silks should be moist and gold and the kernels should be packed in tight, even rows.
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freezing guide

Preparing for Freezing:

Husk and trim the ears, remove silks and wash. Sort according to size. Cobs should be pierced lengthwise in the center with a sharp knife. If freezing kernels, remove them from cobs.

Corn-On-The-Cob:

  • Blanched: Clean and prepare cobs. Water-blanch small ears (1 1/4 inches or less in diameter) for 7 minutes, medium ear for 9 minutes, and larger ears (over 1 1/2 inches in diameter) for 11 minutes. Cool promptly and drain. Transfer to suitable containers, seal and freeze.

  • Unblanched: This is the easiest and fastest way to freeze corn-on-the-cob. Leaves husks on the cobs. Place the ears in a single layer on trays and cookie sheets or just place them directly in the freezer in a single layer. Freeze until firm (48 hours) and place them in large freezer-grade plastic bags for long-term freezing.

  • Boilable Bags: Clean and husk cobs and pack them in boilable bags. Add seasonings if desired, press out air and seal. Blanch bags for 5 minutes on either side. Cool immediately, pat bags dry and freeze.

Whole Kernel Corn:

  • Boilable Bags: Remove kernels from cob. Pack in boilable bags, add desired seasoning, press out air and seal. Blanch in boiling water for 6 minutes. Cool immediately, pat dry bags and freeze.

  • Dry Packs-Water: blanch cobs for 4 to 6 minutes. Cool, drain and remove kernels from cob. Package in suitable containers for freezing, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace. Seal and freeze.
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Cream Style Corn:

  • Blanched: Husk and prepare cobs. Blanch for 4 minutes, cool promptly and drain. Remove kernels from cobs by cutting down through the center of the kernels and scraping the cobs with a knife to remove the juice and hearts from the kernels. Do this over a large kettle. Remove any remaining corn on the cob. Plunge the kettle into a sink filled with ice water and stir to cool. Package, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace, seal and freeze.

  • Unblanched: Husk and prepare cobs. Remove kernels from cobs without blanching by scraping them into a double boiler. Heat for 8 to 10 minutes, or until corn thickens. Stir constantly. Place pan in sink filled with ice water to cool. Package, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace, seal and freeze.

Suitable Packaging:

Freezer containers should be moisture and vapor resistant and should not be prone to cracking or breaking at low temperatures. Containers should provide protection against absorbing flavors or odors and should be easy to label. Suitable packaging for freezing corn includes freezer-grade plastic bags, rigid plastic containers or glass containers and heavy-duty aluminum foil.

Maximum Storage Time:

10 to 12 months at 0ºF.

Thawing:

To remove frozen cobs with husks, run them under cold water.

Tips & Shortcuts:

To cook frozen cream-style corn, add a small amount of milk or light cream, salt, pepper and a 1/2 tablespoon of butter.

Refrigerating Corn:

Keep corn in the refrigerator in perforated plastic bags for 1 to 2 days.
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April 22, 20050 found this helpful

Ingredients:

  • 36 ears of sweet corn
  • 1 cup butter
  • 1 cup half and half

Directions:

Cut corn from cob and place in roaster pan. Melt butter and drizzle over corn. Add half and half and mix. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes. Place in freezer bags. Cool to room temperature and freeze.

By Robin

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By 0 found this helpful
April 18, 2012

It's going to be time to be freezing corn in our area before we know it! There is nothing better than Iowa sweet corn, especially in the cold winter time. It's a great reminder of summer!

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By 0 found this helpful
September 7, 2010

To get 20 cups corn: Insert ears into boiling water. Boil 6 minutes. Take out and put in ice water. Cut kernels off ear. Then measure for above recipe.

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By 0 found this helpful
September 21, 2009

Remove corn from the cob and blanch them. Cool and store in airtight container and freeze.

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Questions

Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

June 19, 20111 found this helpful

Today I cooked some corn on the cob on the stove. I had a lot of leftover cobs. Is it safe to freeze them and then heat then up again in a week or so?

By Mel S.

Answer Was this helpful? 1
June 20, 20110 found this helpful

Yes, be sure to keep refrigerated until just before reheating. I place mine in wax paper and place into microwave. Start with 1 minute and continue until it is hot enough to melt butter and eat.

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June 21, 20110 found this helpful

I wouldn't freeze it, I would refrigerate it. When you reheat it from freezing (if it's been cooked all the way), it will be mushy. :(

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September 5, 20110 found this helpful

Can I put corn in the husk, from my garden, directly in the freezer?

By JE

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By 0 found this helpful
August 12, 2011

With all the gardens here, I get lots of summer corn. What is the best way to freeze it, with the husk on or off? Must I blanch it first or just husk, seal, and store? Thanks for all replies!

By Edith

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August 12, 20110 found this helpful

When I freeze corn, I blanch it first, cool it and cut it off the cob and put in zip lock freezer bags. I have eaten some that has been in the freezer for 4 years and it was just as good as when it was first frozen. I believe in blanching.

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August 15, 20110 found this helpful

I have frozen corn for over 30 years and this I have found:

1. If you are going to leave it on the cob then you blanch it for 7 minutes Ice water it for 14 minutes and dry with a towel, wrap each ear in tin foil and bag. This keeps it fresh for a year at least.

2. If you are going to use within 3 months leave in shuck and put in brown paper bag.

3. If you don't have the space blanch as Litter Gitter said and put in small bags. Tastes just as good without the hassle or extra work. (done this way you can also cut it off the cob and put in lge bowl and microwave till heated through and through.

I didn't like this method unless I used it within 3 months.)

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August 15, 20110 found this helpful

When I freeze corn, I just trim the bottom off close to the bottom of the ear, leave the husk and silk in tact. Wrap each ear in plastic wrap, and store in a wire basket in the freezer. When you are ready to use them, just remove the amount you need, unwrap them, run a little cold water over them, shake off the excess and pop them into the microwave, a couple at a time for about 5 minutes, then remove the husks and the silks. They are pretty warm, so I use a couple folded paper towels when removing the silks. Just rub the towel against the ear of corn from the tip down to the base, and the silks come off pretty easily. No blanching, no fussing, and they taste almost like fresh from the garden. They really are better than what you find in frozen foods at the supermarket.

Harlean from Arkansas

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August 16, 20110 found this helpful

There are many different ways that others swear by. What I do, cause I am elderly and disabled and live alone, is 'clean' the ear-take of the husk, put the ears in gallon size freezer bags, and simply freeze as it. When I want an ear, I take one, wrap it in a paper towel, and microwave it for 4 minutes. Add butter or whatever your choice is, and eat. Satisfies me.

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August 17, 20110 found this helpful

When we had a garden, I froze corn on the cob and off the cob. I preferred it off the cob as sometimes one could taste the cob if frozen on the cob, and it took up much more room in the freezer. When I froze it on the cob I always shucked it, cleaned off the silks, blanched it, cooled it and put them in zip lock bags.

When I froze it off the cob, I shucked it, cleaned off the silks, blanched it, and as soon as it was cool enough to handle, cut it off the cob. I filled a zip lock bag half full, flattened it out and put into freezer. By flattening out the bags, they freeze faster, take up less room, and defrost quicker.

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By 0 found this helpful
August 21, 2011

How do you blanch corn on the cob and then cut it of the cob to freeze it? How long do I boil it and how long do I submerge it in an ice water bath?

By Elaine

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August 21, 20110 found this helpful

I don't remember how long the corn is supposed to be blanced for freezing, but everybody that I know has always cut it off the cob before blanching it.

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August 23, 20110 found this helpful

Bring a 1/2 filled pot of water to a boil. Fill the pot with ears several inches from the top. Cover and bring to 2nd boil. Boil uncovered 3 minutes. Immediately take out and place in icy cold water to stop cooking. Freeze whole. When preparing for meal: thaw and place in boiling water, Bring back to back to boil for another 3 minutes. I personally think corn tastes mushy if boiled more than 6-7 minutes, any less is under done,but that's just me. If you don't want to freeze the cobs whole, than cut kernals off before boiling.

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August 23, 20110 found this helpful

I forgot to add to keep it submerged in the cold water til it's cool enough to handle. The cooking needs to stop inside the kernal. Also it is ok to cook the corn and then cut the kernals off, I just have never done this either.

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August 23, 20110 found this helpful

Husk and silk the ears. Corn must be scalded, on the cob, otherwise there is too much loss of corn milk. Sort ears according to size. Scald only a few at a time. Blanch in boiling water for 4 1/2 minutes. Ice bath until cool enough to handle easy to stop the cooking. Either freeze whole or cut off cob, then freeze. I have done it this way for years. Over a long period of time the one cut off the cob keeps better. These direction are from my freezer book.

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July 31, 20110 found this helpful

What is the best and easiest way to freeze corn-on-the-cob?

By Linda K.

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July 31, 20110 found this helpful

You can google the topic, or in the morning call your Home Extension Agent for your area. I think you will find them in the phone book under your county or a neighboring county.

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July 31, 20110 found this helpful

It's easy. Peal away the leaves and the silk. Cut off the stalk end and the narrow end, just where the mature kernels start. I'm not a big fan of blanching veggies in general, but for this you can. Just about 2 minutes or so. Cool the cobs in an ice bath and store in freezer bags and freeze.

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August 2, 20110 found this helpful

I was told by an old farmers wife to just cut off the stalk and leave in the husk and freeze. Was very good and so easy.

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August 2, 20110 found this helpful

Don't know if it is bad, but I just shuck them. I put in freezer bags and freeze. They seem to be fine when I use them later.

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By 0 found this helpful
September 13, 2010

I tried freezing corn on the cob this year. I followed the instructions in a preserving book. After a few days in the freezer several kernels turned brown. Is this still safe to eat? What happened?

By Geraldine from Havre, MT

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Anonymous
September 13, 20100 found this helpful

If too high a temperature is used when cooking, caramelization of the sugar occurs in the corn, causing the kernels to turn brown.

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September 16, 20100 found this helpful

When I freeze corn on the cob, I shuck the ear and put it in the freezer as is, I put several in a ziplock freezer bag. I live alone so when I want one for a meal, I take out one, wrap it in paper towel and nuke it for 4 minutes. I could boil it, I just don't want to.

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September 26, 20100 found this helpful

You didn't say how you stored your corn in the freezer.

I cut both ends of the ear of corn, remove loose husks, put ears with husks on into a brown paper grocery bag, close the top and freeze. I can remove any amount of corn, finish husking and cook. The best way to cook corn on the cob (learned from grandmother 50 years ago) is to bring water to a boil, drop corn in, when water begins to boil again, corn is done.

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July 20, 20110 found this helpful

Approximately what is the yield from 100 ears of sweet corn after being cut from the cob?

By Nancy

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July 21, 20110 found this helpful

According to what I have heard, it takes about three ears of corn to make one cup.

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July 21, 20110 found this helpful

According to what I have heard, it takes about three ears of corn to make one cup.

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By 0 found this helpful
June 20, 2012

What is the best way to freeze corn on the cob?

By Joyce

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October 10, 20110 found this helpful

What is the shelf life for fresh frozen corn on the cob?

By dfp

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September 4, 20120 found this helpful

Do I need to do anything to the corn; cover in double foil and freeze?

By KAB

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June 28, 20120 found this helpful

We grew, shucked, cleaned, and blanched our corn on the cob, then wrapped it in foil, placed in plastic bags, and froze. Now that we are ready to eat the frozen corn on the cob. Which is the best way to heat or reheat the corn cobs?

By Jan F.

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April 10, 20110 found this helpful

What do I do to corn to ready it for freezing, on the cob?

By Linda from Mesa, AZ

Answers:

Freezing Corn on the Cob

Yahoo groups has a freezing food group which is run by experts; they can answer all questions re freezing and give solid advice; I believe it is called frozen assets; I simply freeze the corn; husk and all; tastes superb! (09/05/2010)

By MzScarlett

Freezing Corn on the Cob

I live alone and do not eat more than one ear of corn at a sitting. When I buy it, I clean/shuck it all and put in plastic freezer bag. Wen I want one for a meal, I take one out, wrap it in a paper towel, and put in microwave for 4 min. When done, butter it, eat. (09/08/2010)

By knitter926

Freezing Corn on the Cob

Corn of cob, if blanched has a watery tasting cob. Leave shuck on it and freeze, OR shuck and remove silk and freeze whole in freezer zip lock bags. This the next thing to fresh. Can be cooked either in water or in microwave from frozen state. When cleaning the corn Do not run any water over the corn. (09/09/2010)

By mgw10146

Freezing Corn on the Cob

Freezing corn on the cob is quick and simple. No blanching, no shucking, just put it in your freezer as is. The shuck itself protects and preserves the taste and the nutrients as it is natures own "ziplock baggie! On the farm we took it straight from the field to the freezer stacking it alternating end and top to conserve space. (09/09/2010)

By flaloulou1

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September 5, 20100 found this helpful

Is it possible to freeze sweet corn on the cob? If so, how is it done? If not, please tell me how to freeze it off the cob. Thank you.

By Marian from Altoona, PA

Answers:

Freezing Corn on the Cob

Yes! It is Ok to freeze corn on the cob, and off the cob, some people I know will blanch the cob first, that is pop the whole thing as it is with the leaves I will call it pulled off, drop it in boiling water for about a minute, then take it out. Place it in the freezer.

Another way, in which I do it, is just take off all the leaves, and clean them up, pop them all in a freezer bag, and put them in the freezer, with a date on the bag of course.

I have tried both ways, we can't tell any difference in the different ways. So it is easier for me to just pop them in the freezer, voila, yummy corn on the cob, and then thaw, and I pop them in the microwave a minute per cob, we love them. (07/30/2010)

By jamish

Freezing Corn on the Cob

This link tells how to freeze fresh corn on the cob.
http://www.ehow.com/how_5429586_freeze-corn-cob-blanching.html

For off the cob, I blanch the corn three minutes and let drain. Cut off the cob carefully so you don't get the cob in your corn or it won't taste as good. Put cut corn into freezer bags and place in freezer after cooling. When preparing the sweet corn to serve, I put it into a covered bowl adding a packet of sugar and butter, salt and pepper to taste before microwaving. (07/30/2010)

By Lorelei

Freezing Corn on the Cob

We freeze corn on the cob every year that we have access to good "silver queen", as that is our favorite. All we do is check for possible "bugs" at the tip, and remove if there is one, then put in freezer zip type bags, or use the seal bags that pull the air out and heat seal. We have done both, and both work. We found one pack of 4 ears 15 months after they had been frozen, but after the normal time in microwave, straight from the freezer, you would think they had just been pulled from the field. We do not blanch, pull silks, or anything, just look for bugs, take excess outer husk off, cut bottom stem which is usually 3 or 4 inches too long, and get them in the freezer, which is the most important thing. Try it, works great, and you can do 5 dozen in very short order. We do that many each time, and we are no spring chickens, so enjoy.

Loretta from Theodore, AL (07/30/2010)

By LJF

Freezing Corn on the Cob

Yes, you can freeze corn on the cob! In fact, my husband and I think it is sweeter and better tasting after having been frozen. I always purchase large amounts of corn on the cob when it is on sale. I remove the husks and the silk and place 3 to 4 ears in heavy duty freezer bags. Then I pop them in the freezer and use them as needed. They freeze well for a very long time. I am still using some I froze last summer and they taste just as delicious as if I bought them yesterday. (07/30/2010)

By sweetpea49

Freezing Corn on the Cob

I live alone and freeze corn on the cob as much as I can. Just take the husks off, put in zippy bag and freeze. When I want one I take out one, wrap in paper towel and nuke it for 4 minutes. (07/30/2010)

By knitter926

Freezing Corn on the Cob

I have frozen corn without blanching too, but I had to throw it out. You should blanch it in boiling water for 3 minutes, put it immediately into a sink of ice water for 3 minutes, then put in freezer bags, being sure to get all the air out of the bags. Vegetables that are not blanched can have bacteria on them and cause you to get sick, as freezing doesn't kill it. (07/31/2010)

By RHONDARUE

Freezing Corn on the Cob

I froze corn both whole and cut it off the cob. I liked it both ways as the cut corn was great for casseroles and other dishes, while the whole corn was great during the winter when we craved corn on the cob. I blanch my corn for 3 minutes and either freeze it whole or cut it off the cob. I think it depends on what you want to do. (07/31/2010)

By morbetomommy

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July 29, 20100 found this helpful

How do I freeze fresh corn on the cob?

By Judy from Sarasota, FL

Answers:

Freezing Corn on the Cob

After shucking the ear of corn, I wrap it in foil, and put in freezer. That's all. Since I live alone, I thaw one, wrap in paper towel and microwave a couple minutes. Handle carefully, hot to handle. (06/02/2010)

By knitter926

Freezing Corn on the Cob

You can freeze it in the husks for a couple of months without losing flavor, but you need to pull the husks back, rinse off the corn (not husks), pat dry and replace the husks tightly. You don't need to, but you can wrap in foil after doing this.

(06/02/2010)

By Deeli

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June 1, 20100 found this helpful

Fresh corn on the cob, we usually cut some off both ends and put in microwave for 2 minutes for each, then easily shuck it.

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August 7, 20090 found this helpful

Is it OK to freeze corn on the cob without blanching the cobs?

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July 2, 20090 found this helpful

I know that corn on the cob can be frozen, but I don't know if any special prep is needed to do this. Could someone please tell me what I need to do to freeze it on the cob? My dd's grandmother gives us some of their extra.

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July 7, 20060 found this helpful
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