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Moving Duck Eggs

Whether they are your pets or just a nest of eggs that need to be moved, moving duck eggs can be a tricky endeavor, but it can be done. This guide is about moving duck eggs.
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Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

0 found this helpful
August 4, 2015 Flag

My duck was thought missing for 3 days, but I found her last night sitting on 16 duck and 2 random chicken eggs. She is in a questionable spot and we have big dogs. Can I move her and the nest into a sitting box and have her still care for them?

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August 6, 20150 found this helpful
Best Answer

You need to talk to someone who has experience with raising ducks. Is there a local farmer you could consult, or a government agricultural office that might help? Sometimes there are experts at colleges that have vet medicine programs or agricultural programs.

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August 6, 20150 found this helpful

Try calling the county extension office, perhaps a 4H club might have some experience with ducks. I sure would like to hear what happens.

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0 found this helpful
June 24, 2008 Flag

I found 7 duck eggs on the ground. My friends touched them but I did not. The next day I checked on them and they were gone. I was wondering since "What eats duck eggs?"

Shannon from Kamloops, B.C. Canada

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June 24, 20080 found this helpful
Best Answer

Snakes

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June 24, 20080 found this helpful
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Dogs love eggs of all kinds. So do foxes, possums, racoons, and birds of prey like hawks and owls.

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June 24, 20080 found this helpful

Fox, coyotes, most likely raccoon, cats.

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June 24, 20080 found this helpful

I think also weasels and mink.

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June 25, 20080 found this helpful

Raccoons love them, and also foxes.

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May 10, 2016 Flag

We had a duck lay one egg in our bark at work 2 days ago. The egg was completely exposed to the elements. We hadn't seen the mother duck until today when she came looking for her egg. We assumed she abandoned the egg, so we picked it up with rubber gloves, placed it in a warm towel and laid it in the sun for warmth. The mother duck returned today, however we have her egg inside. If we place the egg back, will the mother return?

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May 10, 20160 found this helpful

The egg requires higher more consistent temperatures to survive so is certainly dead now.

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Anonymous Flag
May 12, 20160 found this helpful

Not really sure if she'll take the egg back but I did hatch one with a heating pad before. The mother was killed by the neighbors dog & it was the only one left. You will have to roll the egg just as the mother would.

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May 12, 20160 found this helpful

Ducks lay "practice eggs" all over the place before they get around to building a nest. I don't know why.

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May 12, 20160 found this helpful

You may return this egg to where you found it, but it may already be dead, depending on what temperature it reached while you had it in the towel or sitting in the sun. A certain level of heat initiates development of the duckling, and then to remove the heat will stop development so that the duckling will die. Incubation is not meant to begin until all the eggs have been laid and the mother is ready to incubate them for the full duration of time... it should not be started and stopped, or attempted with haphazard temperatures. With ducks, the eggs are left exposed to the elements until all eggs are laid, and this does not harm them. All birds must lay their full clutch of eggs over several days, leaving the eggs exposed until they have completed their clutch and will then begin incubating. Next time, please leave the eggs where they are laid. Without an incubator set to the proper temperature and humidity, you are doing more harm than good, despite well-meaning intentions.

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May 4, 2016 Flag

I had several duck eggs laid about two weeks ago, 12 in total. I noticed two days ago one egg was out of the nest about two feet away. Today 4 more seemingly were kicked out again all about two feet away. One of the eggs the very top was broken off and looked to have some egg yolk left but not much else. I see ducks over there every day. Are these eggs not good or what could have happened?

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May 4, 20160 found this helpful

If the ducks are not sitting on the eggs and/or they have rolled away from the nest, and are cold for even a short time (only a few hours), then the babies are dead.

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Anonymous Flag
December 11, 20160 found this helpful

I have heard of crows stealing and dropping eggs

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0 found this helpful
April 28, 2016 Flag

I have 3 duck nests in my yard, each nest has 20 plus eggs. The momma ducks are caring for them and at this point and are not leaving their nests. They are obviously not sitting on all of the eggs because their bodies are not that big. Is it possible all of the eggs will not hatch? Also, one nest is on a hill, a few have rolled down about 1-2 feet (see pic), should I put them back? I do not live on a farm either hahaha. They are so beautiful tho so I am watching them closely. She is on the nest under the branch. She is pretty much used to me because I am around all the time.

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May 5, 20160 found this helpful

How neat. Please take pictures.

As for the rest, all the eggs will not hatch. Ducks are frequently careless with their eggs. Nature makes up for that by providing enough living chicks for the duck to care for without becoming completely overwhelmed. The stray eggs frequently make meals for racoons and black snakes, so these are also part of nature's plan.

Resist the urge to rescue stray eggs, however, if they aren't disposed of naturally within a few days dispose of them so they don't rot.

Your ducks should be happy and healthy with cute babies. They require little help from humans.

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June 18, 2012 Flag

Two ducks have been hanging around my swimming pool. Last night the female laid an egg in the pool. I fished the egg out of the pool without touching it and put it in a grass insert for a flower basket. Will the ducks care for it or should I just throw the egg away?

By Brian from Setauket, NY

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February 27, 20150 found this helpful

If the mother doesn't come back, put the egg in your hand and carefully take it inside. Put it in a box and keep the box open then put the egg in the box with a soft pillow and a big flashlight to keep it warm. You never want to throw it away.

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May 5, 2010 Flag

Can I safely move a mallard hen's eggs to another location and will she continue to sit on them?

By Robert from Kinder, LA

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May 6, 20100 found this helpful

It's not likely that you can move wild duck nests and have the mother stay with them.

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May 5, 2010 Flag

I need to move a nest with duck eggs in it. Where and how can I make new nest?

By Poe 135

Answers:

Moving Duck Eggs

If these are wild ducks, most likely they will not survive a move. If they are pet ducks, pick up the entire thing and move it with the momma present so she will see where it is going to. Move it a little at a time.
Even then she may not like the new location and quit sitting.
Sometimes we can move our ducks and chickens within the coop area, other times they say forget it and quit sitting. Good luck. (04/23/2009)

By mom-from-missouri

Moving Duck Eggs

A few years back there was a wild duck nest with eggs under a bush right in the middle of our grocery store parking lot. The DNR was notified and the nest was not moved until all the eggs were hatched. I couldn't believe that for weeks no one touched those eggs. After they all hatched, the DNR moved them to a safe place. I suggest you call the DNR or local wild animal refuge organization. (04/24/2009)

By antiquefreeque

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