Which Wine to Use for Cooking?

My husband and I are wanting to eat healthier and we're trying new recipes. The problem is when some of the recipes call for a little red or white wine, we have no clue what to use.

Standing in front of any wine display is like standing in front of a pain reliever counter. There are dozens and dozens to choose from? Which one do you choose? We know nothing about wine.

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By SusanLee from Waynesville, GA

May 25, 20110 found this helpful

I use wine in some my cooking recipes. Don't use the cooking wine that is sold in the grocery stores, they are laden with salt.

Purchase regular table wine that can be purchased from liquor stores.

I borrowed a paperback book from the library entitled "Wine Tasting for Dummies." It might not be the exact title, but it's pretty close. It explained the different types of wines and what they are used for.

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May 25, 20110 found this helpful

Wines are based on ones taste pallet. White is fruity while red is dry. I use red when cooking beef & white when I cook pastas, white meat & seafood. Realize that the alcohol will evaporate and so the flavor left behind will enhances the flavor of the dish. There is also red & white wine vinegars. I would buy small bottles and just experiment. But what ever you do, do not buy "cooking" wine. It has additives and high levels of salt.

have fun experimenting.

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May 26, 20110 found this helpful

Honestly, pick one appropriate to the meat (white wines for white meats and seafood, red wines for red meats), and I get one that's not sweet, not too dry, and is cheap. There's no use in buying an expensive wine to cook. I never use a blush or rose' wine to cook.

You know, sometimes I get the little four-pack tiny bottles of red or white wine for cooking. That way, I don't have to worry about leftover wine, or storage space, or drinking the stuff. :D

If I want to drink wine, I'll buy a better wine of which I like the taste.

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May 26, 20110 found this helpful

By the way, when I say "four packs of wines", they're small four packs of little bottles intended for drinking; I just *use* them for cooking only. To clarify, I never use "cooking wine".

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Anonymous Flag
May 26, 20110 found this helpful

The inputs are good however I am new at using wine too and I want to know the name of a good brands. I have tried different kinds but they don't taste good to me. Can people say what brands you use or is that a no, no.

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May 26, 20110 found this helpful

Check this site out, it may help with your questions.

http://www.easy-wine.net/merlot-wine-recommendations.htm

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May 26, 20110 found this helpful

I have always used with excellent results: White-Tisdale, Red-Marsella.

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May 26, 20110 found this helpful

Yes stay away from the cooking wines! A good rule of thumb is red wines for red meats and white wines for white meat. Keep it simple and moderately priced. The only wines you need to really worry about quality-wise is Marsala and Port. I've used YellowTail white & reds, Beringer, and a local San Sebastian Winery. Stick to the $10-$20 price range and you should do fine.

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Anonymous Flag
May 27, 20110 found this helpful

THANK YOU FOR THE LINKS Deeli Sorry I forgot to type in lower case, I was

not yelling.

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May 29, 20110 found this helpful

eg: Sauvignon Blanc (white wine) for chicken dishes, such as Chicken Piccata, white chicken caccitori, etc..

Merlot (red wine) is excellent in beef dishes, such as Beef Stew, Pot Roast. We also put some in the sauce we make for pasta. It is a basic Italian tomato sauce with meatballs and pork in the sauce. You would put the wine in after you saute your onions and garlic let it cook down a bit and then add the tomatoes etc.

Enjoy!

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