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Fixing Roots After Dyeing Hair

Category Coloring
Root color correction is a constant challenge when dyeing your hair. Whether it is the need to dye them as they grow out or because their did not take the new color the same way as the rest of your hair, they often need special attention. This is a page about fixing roots after dyeing hair.
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I bleached my hair and then dyed it golden brown, but my roots stayed blond and my ends are golden brown. What can I do to repair it?

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April 20, 20170 found this helpful
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You need to lift the blond out and apply the darker color. The lower part of your hair is more porous, and accepted the dye. I would go to a beauty school or professional to get it right this time.

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April 21, 20170 found this helpful
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It would be helpful to know if there had been any other chemical treatments done to the hair prior to this bleach and tone.

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Virgin hair is naturally more porous along the shaft and ends due to age and exposure to the elements. The hair at the scalp is the least porous. However, the body heat from the scalp can cause the bleach to work faster, there. All these things should be taken into consideration. Hair coloring is nor a simple procedure. I'm assuming you did not use a heat cap nor wrap the hair and sit under a hot dryer. I'm also assuming you applied the bleach to the entire head all at once. If you did, the results you got are exactly what would be expected.

If you plan to correct this color yourself, I suggest you enlist the help of a friend.

First, more bleach needs to be applied to the less porous root area. The friend should be able to determine where the blond ends and the golden brown begins. You cannot do this yourself. The bleach should not be allowed to overlap into the golden brown area.

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I don't know what type or brand bleach you used. I assume it was a full strength bleach. Do NOT use this same bleach to do your color correction! You could end up with much breakage.

Instead, use a mild oil bleach. It will be more gentle and will work more slowly. This will give you more control over the bleach. Do not use a developer stronger than 20 volume peroxide.

Without seeing the hair, no one could say how long the bleach should remain on the hair. I will estimate one half hour. Then the hair should be thoroughly rinsed (not washed), and then gently towel dried til only slightly damp.

Next, the same golden brown color should be applied to the re bleached area only. If the full development time of the color is 45 minutes, then after the color has been on the re bleached hair for half an hour, it should then be combed through to the shaft and ends for the remaining 15 minutes.

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All these suggestions are not concrete. There are variables. For example, you may not need to leave the golden brown on the scalp area for an initial 30 minutes. A professional colorist would periodically towel dry a strand of the hair to see if the developing color at the scalp is approaching that color on the shaft and ends. The color might need to remain at the scalp for as little as 20 minutes and the shaft and ends for an additional 5 minutes.

I wish you luck and a good friend to help.

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June 16, 2018

I went to a hair dresser to colour my hair from black to copper red. The roots are orange and the rest is the colour I wanted. What do I do to tone down the orange roots?

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June 17, 20180 found this helpful
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I agree with Judy that you should consider taking to the stylist who did the dye job. I have found that if I ask for "help understanding why...." in this case..."can you help me understand why the roots turned orange and what I can do to tone it down", rather going in like the young me would do and saying what the h*** did you do to my hair?

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that the stylist will often offer to take care of it without charge...this way everyone wins. Just my two cents worth!

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I just wondered if anyone can advise me, please? I regularly use Olia hair colour in a light blonde shade. My natural hair is light brown with quite a bit of grey. I have the problem, when checking my hair at the back, dark roots are very obvious at the back of my head even after just dyeing the roots. My hair is in a shoulder length bob, the texture is fine (I won't take a curl at all) and parts at the back showing the darker roots. I have to spend ages brushing it to try and hide them, which doesn't always work. It looks horrible! Any ideas please?

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January 3, 20190 found this helpful

You need a two step process. The dark color is lifted off and the lighter color is deposited. This is a job for a professional.

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January 5, 20190 found this helpful

Hi.thanks for taking the time to reply!. Unfortunately I dont have the option of consulting a professional,as I am retired on a very small state pension.

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Ive always coloured my hair myself because of this. I think its the way my hair falls,at the back-it will never hang nice and straight for long.maybe a darker blonde would be the answer.

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January 5, 20190 found this helpful

I have the same problem

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January 5, 20190 found this helpful

You said your hair is a shoulder length bob. This would indicate that the hair is pretty much all one length. You also said your hair texture is fine. If your hair is thick enough to allow some moderate layering in the back, this should take some of the weight from that area, making the hair less 'lanky' and less prone to separating. Also, if you are not opposed to the idea, a little hidden teasing (backcombing) would help the hair stay in place.

The darker hair at the back is natural as there is more pigment in this area and usually it is the last to 'grey'. The less difference between this natural dark color and the hair color shade you choose, the better. I think you should do as you have suggested and choose a darker blond. While this wont make the roots at the back any lighter, it will help blend your lighter and darker hair to a more uniform color.

Good luck

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January 5, 20190 found this helpful

An added note:
Should you decide to try removing a bit of weight from the hair in back, I hope you can find someone who is good with a razor and will devote the time to be extra careful and remove only a small amount of hair. What with your hair being fine, do not allow anyone near it with thinning shears!

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July 11, 2019

If I keep getting my hair dyed, will my natural hair colour eventually stop coming through as quick? My ginger keeps coming through within a week or 2 weeks of getting it done.

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July 11, 20190 found this helpful

Your hair grows the same, whether or not you dye it. Touching up roots is part of the package when you choose to dye your hair.

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July 12, 20190 found this helpful

Your natural hair color is determined by genetics. Applying color to your hair wont change that.

One week is a very short time to be seeing an obvious regrowth, even on dark hair bleached and toned a pale blond. One solution you might want to consider is choosing a color somewhere between the color you're using now, and your natural ginger. That might cut down the frequency of your retouches.

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July 12, 20190 found this helpful

Are you using a semi permanent? Try a permanent. It will not come through and you'll just have to redo your growing roots.

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January 25, 2019

I have dyed my dark brown hair to light blonde and I love it! But how can I dye my dark brown roots back to light blonde safely at home? I have been using L'Oreal Platinum Blonde.

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January 25, 20190 found this helpful

It is a two step process. You have to lift the old color off and deposit the new. It is best done by a professional. If money is tight, go to a beauty school

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February 24, 20190 found this helpful

I have never used them, but friends who still do DIY dyes use touch up kits for roots. L'Oreal makes them.

Be sure to be good to your hair and not over process it.

Post back what you decided.

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December 18, 2018

I let my friend dye my hair yesterday and overall she did a great job, but she did miss my roots. I looked and there is no root cover that matches the new color. Would it be all right to just dye the missed pieces?

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December 18, 20180 found this helpful

You can dye the roots if she missed spots. Mix the developer and dye 1:1.

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December 21, 20180 found this helpful

There are root only touch up systems that may give you more control in the process, as long as you can find a color match. Safety first with hair so you don't want to risk going over already dyed hair a second time!

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