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Uses for Old Garden Hose

Category Reusing
Before throwing away a leaky water hose, there are a number of ways it can be reused. This is a guide about uses for old garden hose.
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April 29, 2010

Don't throw away your old garden hoses there are many uses for them.

By Ann Winberg from Loup City, NE

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April 29, 20100 found this helpful
Top Comment

Cut a 6 inch length, split it. Use it on bucket handles to avoid hurting your palm.

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April 30, 20100 found this helpful
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Two ways I use the hoses are as "siphoning" hoses. The one way I use it is to siphon from a rain barrel to plants that require watering. The hose can be as short or long as you want. I will often use a 50' hose to reach plants far away.

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The easy way to siphon is to fill the hose with water first. Don't let this discourage you. Place one end of the hose in the barrel and "feed" in balance of the hose in a "straight" line.

Do not "dump" the balance of the hose into the barrel. (No looping - air trap will occur in the hose.) The purpose is to have the complete hose filled with water. When both ends are into the barrel place your thumbs on both ends (we don't want the water to leak out and air to replace the water in the hose), placing one end of the hose at the bottom of the barrel (which may need a weight to keep the hose in place), and pull out the other end of the hose - still with your thumb over the end- and place it lower than the water in the barrel and the water will begin to siphon out. Don't worry if you see some air - there will be more water pushing a little bit of air out of the way. Place the end of the hose at the plants you want to water.

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Water will continue coming out of the hose until the end of the hose is lower than the level of water in the barrel (and/or the other end of the hose). The second use is the same as above except to remove some of the water from my aquarium. (I live outside of the city so this works great for me. Fill the hose as above.) I place the hose outside of the window for drainage. It does not matter if the hose slacks (even on the floor - so long as the hose outside is lower than the aquarium -or even placed at the level you want the water to drain to - to save from taking too much water from the aquarium).

This is a bit tricky the first several tries, so don't be discouraged. It is easy to splash water on the floor or window sill. Keep some towels nearby for spilled water, or more importantly empty all of the water from the aquarium - so stay near the aquarium as to not injure your fish. When the level of the aquarium reaches the level you want just remove the hose from the aquarium and let the excess water run out of the hose and place the hose outside via the open window. Then fill the tank with fresh water. I like not needing a pump for watering or removing water from the aquarium :), nor electricity to power the pump.

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Redbeard

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April 24, 20140 found this helpful
Top Comment

I have seen a garden wreath made with a length of hose (about 6') held together with some wire. Add a bow (maybe burlap) and add some silk flowers and vines for interest and you have a unique and lovely decoration for your garden shed or fence. I would put hose ends on a length that I cut off a longer hose to make it look finished.

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By 12 found this helpful
August 11, 2010

Use pieces of a leaky garden hose to cover a metal handle on a bucket. Trim to handle size and slit the hose down one side. Slip it over the handle and secure with electrical tape.

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Source: my grandparents

By Monica from Cortez, CO

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November 14, 2007

My garden hose has been left outside neglected too many times but it still has a purpose as saw blade covers! Cut the hose to the length of the blade and slit down the side so that it can be slid over the blade as protection. It could also serve another way in the garden to mark out a curvy edge for plants rather than a straight one. Just toss it out along where you want it and move it a little bit to make nice curves for the flower beds or garden rock!

By melody_yesterday

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June 28, 20063 found this helpful

If you have an old or cracked garden hose lying around it's pretty easy to turn it into a drip irrigation hose. Use an ice pick or other sharp implement to poke holes in the hose.

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By 1 found this helpful
November 16, 2015

Cut a length of hose from the end that you screw onto the tap. Make it long enough to reach your laundry tubs from the hot water tank faucet.

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By 3 found this helpful
July 1, 2014

Use your old garden hose as a border for your garden. It keeps rabbits out because they think it's a snake.

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September 7, 20171 found this helpful

Use an old retired garden hose and some zip ties to make a useful garden basket. It could even be used as a planter. This is a guide about making a recycled garden hose basket.

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By 2 found this helpful
August 10, 2010

To stop the splinters, measure the length and the thickness of the handles. Go to your auto parts store and request a water hose that has a diameter smaller than the wheel barrow handle and a length just an inch longer than the combined length of both handles.

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August 23, 20170 found this helpful

Old hoses can be recycled in a variety of creative ways. This page shows you how to make a hose wreath.

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Questions

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By 0 found this helpful
April 7, 2010

How can I recycle an old garden water hose that has a hole in it? I am not interesting in trying to repair it but can I use it for something else?

By Betty from Lubbock, TX

Answers

April 7, 20100 found this helpful
Best Answer

Add some more holes and use it to make a soaker hose for your flowers or garden.

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April 7, 20100 found this helpful
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I made a sprinkler out of mine. You can also make a slow-drip hose to water your outdoor plants & flowers.

First dry out the hose, then take an old soldering iron & use the end of the hot soldering iron to poke holes in the hose every 1 or 2 inches. Wait several seconds between holes for the iron the reheat. You can buy a soldering iron for around $5 & if you wipe all the rubber off the soldering iron while it's still hot you can still use it to solder with later.

You can use this hose to slowly feed your plants & you can even bury it underground if you like & just drip the water slowly. Or you can use it as a sprinkler above ground. I made mine for an area where I was going to have a ditch dug for additional wiring & used it to wet & soften the ground before digging.

Before using your new hose, cover the end of it with Duct Tape or a screw-on hose attachment that you can close to keep the water in so the pressure will build up & make the water squirt out of the hose. It works best if you align the holes (when poking them) along only one side of the hose. Place the holes up for an above-ground sprinkler & down for an underground drip-feeder.

If you want to make a drip-water hose, you'll have to first know where you are going to bury it. Simply measure the area BETWEEN the plants & don't poke holes where there are no plants. Underground drip-watering is a very effective way to water your plants & conserve water because hardly any water evaporates so you can also water during the warm part of the day.

You need more holes further away from the spigot & less holes closer, because there is more water pressure closer to the faucet.

You can also repair almost any hose.
They sell all the pieces to repair them at Hardware stores & also at Big Lots (the liquidation store).

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April 8, 20100 found this helpful
Best Answer

I have seen people who have to tie their small trees up, use it to cover the string so the string doesn't touch the tree branches. They do that at the parks over here, all the time. I like the soaker hose idea, it uses less water.

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April 8, 20101 found this helpful
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If you have fruit trees, put it in them to keep birds away.

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By 0 found this helpful
September 29, 2013

How do I use an old hose as a planter?

By lpiascik

Answers

May 7, 20140 found this helpful

I did it this way...
http://abuildin  01-zip-ties.html

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