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Preventing Static Electricity

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There are many materials that can give you a shock. This guide is about preventing static electricity.
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Solutions

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March 28, 2017

Especially in winter, sometimes you want to wear leggings, yoga pants, or even pajama bottoms under long skirts or dresses. Yet the inevitable annoyance of static electricity rears its ugly head and ruins things for you.

The thing to do is to affix one safety pin per leg, on your pants, leggings, etc. underneath the skirt. The metal conducts the static electricity and prevents your clothes from getting all wrinkled.

Talcum powder also works.

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January 6, 2009

I got so tired of getting zapped with static electricity every time I touch a light switch. Ouch! So I cut some dryer sheets in quarters and tucked a piece under a corner of each of the light switch covers (they could also be thumb tacked or taped there). Now, I take an extra second to squeeze and rub the sheet between my fingers before hitting the switch. I also tie a strip on each doorknob to touch before touching the metal. Voila! No more shocks! If you don't want to decorate your home with dryer sheets, you can tuck a dryer sheet in your pocket for the same purpose.

By Peggy G from Yulan, NY

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By 1 found this helpful
March 16, 2011

Use a dryer sheet to eliminate static electricity from venetian blinds.

By duckie-do from Cortez, CO

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August 17, 20160 found this helpful

This is a guide about reducing static electricity from microfiber furniture. Synthetic fibers can create a lot of static electricity. It is not fun to get a shock from your couch or chair.

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Questions

Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

By 7 found this helpful
January 19, 2011

I am looking for help with static electricity on door knobs, light switches, etc. You know the generally annoying type. I found some answers on Thriftyfun like wearing a safety pin and spraying carpet with diluted fabric softener. I haven't tried them yet. I am wondering what other solutions are out there. Thanks.

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By Viki from Abbeville, AL

Answers

January 20, 20110 found this helpful
Best Answer

I had the same problem. I put 1/3 fabric softer to 2/3 water in a spray bottle and lightly spray furniture and carpets. Another solution is to get moisture in the house. Either buy a humidifier or simply boil some water. You can also use the spray in your car.

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January 20, 20110 found this helpful
Best Answer

In all probability you have low humidity in your house. A humidifier will rectify this problem. Just take care not to overhumidify. If you do condensation will appear on windows.

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By 0 found this helpful
October 30, 2008

Since the weather has changed, I find that when I pet the dog, we have a little static electricity problem. Any suggestions? He's an American pit bull terrier mix, 60 lbs.

Holly from Richardson, TX

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Answers

By guest (Guest Post)
October 31, 20080 found this helpful

Low humidity is the most likely the culprit, try boiling a pot of water and see what happens.

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October 31, 20080 found this helpful

It's from the ions in the air, and will go away when you get another change. I'm sensitive to this too, and get little shocks from touching metal things, and my clothes do that static thing of clinging to me.
It will go.
Regards, Leah from Down Under

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October 31, 20080 found this helpful

A thin coating of hand lotion before you give the pup the rubdown may help. Adds the moisture to your hands that is missing. I recall using that trick when my clothes have static cling or I keep shocking myself. Just not so much that you leave a residue on the pooch.

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October 31, 20080 found this helpful

The air needs to be humidified. You can either get a humidifier that connects to your furnace, buy a portable humidifer, or place bowls of water in front of some of the heat registers.

Do NOT use lotions OR dryer sheets!!!

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October 31, 20080 found this helpful

DO NOT USE LOTION AND PET YOUR DOG. He licks himself and could ingest it. It has nothing to do with your dog or his breed it is the lack of humidity in the air. get a humidifier or boil a some water on the stove(watch so water doesnt boil away!) add a cinnamon stick makes whole house smell good.

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November 1, 20080 found this helpful

Gently wipe him with a dryer sheet. They are made to reduce static and he will smell good too.

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November 2, 20080 found this helpful

Do NOT use lotions OR dryer sheets. Remember that anything you put on your animals will be ingested when they clean themselves.

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By guest (Guest Post)
November 8, 20080 found this helpful

I know what that feels like. I have a few ideas. The air does become drier in the fall and winter. I use a tabletop humidifier, also, I use an old dutch oven on the stove that I fill with water, and if the air is really dry, I add a little salt to it, and let it simmer. Adding cloves, orange or lemon peel, cinnamon is optional.

For the dog, I use a conditioning shampoo. Also, under my Vet's guidance, my dogs get Omega 3-6-9 capsules. When I took this supplement in to my Vet, he seemed to be very happy about it. My Vet said these softgels help their entire body, and that includes their dry coat. However, the dosage needs to be determined by the Vet, so over/under supplementation does not occur.

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July 12, 20110 found this helpful

How do I get static electricity out of new furniture? It's awful.

By Pam

Answers

July 13, 20110 found this helpful

Have you tried Static Guard spray? I'm never without it b/c my hair and clothes are always staticky. I buy mine at the grocery store, Walmart, Target, Walgreens, etc. I've heard that dryer sheets rubbed on clothing will work, but they didn't work on my clothes, but may work on your furniture. Wishing you luck!

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July 19, 20110 found this helpful

They really do have a product for everything! Never knew such things existed. Very interesting nonetheless.

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By 0 found this helpful
June 4, 2017

Why is there so much static electricity around the metal door frames on my home? My daughter and I are both getting shocked even when barefoot and just sitting at the doorway of our home. This is happening at both the front and back door of our home.

Answers

June 6, 20170 found this helpful

You can make sure you touch wood before you touch the metal. This will remove some of the charge in you.

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By 0 found this helpful
July 23, 2009

I get a shock of static electricity from a wooden floor that is laid on top of carpets. What could be the problem?

By Jeky from Gibraltar, Europe

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Archives

ThriftyFun is one of the longest running frugal living communities on the Internet. These are archives of older discussions.

March 31, 20090 found this helpful

I would appreciate any ideas regarding this; My co-workers and I always get shocked at the office. Every time we touch a file cabinet or a metal door frame - we see sparks fly. I guess it's only static electricity, but does anyone know of a way to stop it? We're all pretty tired of getting shocked every time we touch a metal object at work.

Answers:

Static Electricity Shock

Dilute fabric softener and spray the carpet in your office. The time between applications depends on humidity, traffic, etc. (01/09/2001)

By lelbel

Static Electricity Shock

Use a vaporizer, or any means to get moisture in the rooms. I boil water on the stove & if I have unwanted smells I add a little vinegar (01/09/2001)

By gold89wing

Static Electricity Shock

I work in an office and also had a horrible time with this. The simple trick is: touch wood before you touch any metal (like your desk). It's amazing but it works. The mail room personnel told me and I have not had a problem since. Mimi - Katy, Texas (01/10/2001)

Static Electricity Shock

At an office I used to work in, we kept a large crock pot full of water on low all day and this seemed to take away the static electricity. Worked like a charm! (01/25/2001)

By kshrum

Static Electricity Shock

Lelbel's tip works great. I read it elsewhere a while back and tried it out at my old job (a computer job, so static electricity is really a bad thing!). If I recall correctly, I used 1 part fabric softener to two parts water (maybe even more water) in a plastic gardening spray bottle. It costs pennies and lasts a long time. It also works great in your car if, like me, you get a huge jolt every time you get out of the car! (12/03/2006)

By glandix

Static Electricity Shock

I do too! I noticed when I walk around barefoot in my socks it doesn't happen. I am trying to find slippers to wear at work without rubber on them. I think it is the rubber sole that does it along with the carpet. (09/14/2007)

By Barb

Static Electricity Shock

You can buy wrist bands that ground the static electricity. Spraying fabric softener is not really a realistic option if you walk around everywhere. (10/01/2007)

By Graeme

Static Electricity Shock

The wood tip is great. I too have been getting shocked at my new office job that has carpeting throughout and many computers. A vaporizer wouldn't be that great around computers, so I will be sure to try the wood trick.
(02/20/2008)

By Amy

Static Electricity Shock

Try putting a humidifier in the office. This will eliminate the dryness in the room. Give it a few days to begin working. (04/20/2008)

By RICH

Static Electricity Shock

I have noticed as my hormones deplete, static shocks increase. I also know that if a building is not grounded well, everyone inside will get shocked every time they touch metal. Such a case was discovered in Whitehall Ohio at a Kroger store (09/11/2008)

By Prime

Static Electricity Shock

I hate getting shocked, but I figured out a solution. Put butter on your hands so the static would detract itself from shocking you. It may sound ridiculous but it works, trust me.
(09/22/2008)

By Poofy

Static Electricity Shock

The only way I've been able to deal with shock is by touching everything with my knuckles, it hurts less but still there's a good shock going on. I went to kiss my son on the forehead and got shocked on the lips so it doesn't apply to everything. We don't even have carpet in our house so it mystifies me...and cars...don't get me started there. (12/18/2008)

By Joy

Static Electricity Shock

I recently noticed that a new computer I was building was getting shocked upon touching the metal start button. I unplugged things one at a time to check all wiring until there was nothing left at which time I unplugged the machine. It turned out that every time I sat in a particular chair purchased at SAMs Club the shock occurs. I was working at an office were they again had a computer shock problem and noticed the chair was the same. Replaced the chair- no more problem, but not before she lost an entire data base. I'm guessing certain chair fabrics are more vulnerable than others. Good luck. (12/20/2008)

By Doug

Static Electricity Shock

Take a metal object, like a key, and touch it to the metal object (file cabinet). The key is a different type of metal, so you won't get shocked by touching it. The charge will be depleted and you won't feel the shock. You'll hear it though! (01/11/2009)

By Ryan

Static Electricity Shock

A few months ago we got new carpet in the living room and two new microfiber recliners. My husband is constantly getting shocked when he touches anyone or anything. I sit in the chairs, walk on the carpet, and do everything he does, yet seldom get shocked. He even got shocked in a Wal-Mart over 200 miles away when there was no carpet or microfiber chairs. This doesn't appear to be related to shoes he's wearing. Any help appreciated. (01/24/2009)

By Pat

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