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House Trained Dog Pooping Inside

It is frustrating and confusing when your house trained dog backslides. This is a guide about what to do when a previously house broken dog has started pooping in the house.
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Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

January 15, 2017

I have a Chihuahua/Dachshund mix who is 5 years old. She is trained to go to the bathroom outside, but recently has been continuously going to the washroom inside on the carpets. I'm not sure if it's the cold weather or if she's mad at something and that's why she keeps doing it, but it's really frustrating. Even after bringing her outside, she'll come inside and poop on the rug right away. I'm not sure what to do!

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January 18, 20170 found this helpful

It sounds like she just habituated herself to poop there, most likely due to the smell.

Make sure to hyper clean the area, even changing the carpet if necesary, and mixing stuff up in there, so that she makes sure to not recognize the area

Also, she sounds like a very small dog, and this could be a cry for help. Do you take her to an area where she might be intimidated by other bigger dogs? Does she feel threatened at all? Animals can be wary of depositing their faeces where they feel threatened by predators, because thru faeces is how predators track prey (this is why cats use litter boxes and bury their business)

Barring a medical condition, and barring her not being housebroken, I would maybe try to walk her somewhere she doesn't feel threatened

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By 0 found this helpful
May 4, 2017

My 6 yr old hound mix has started pooping in a line both inside and out, but even more troubling is that he is pooping at random in house in no particular order. He is very perky and has a dog door. But even on walks he has to poop a bit then the remainder falls out while walking. He had his anal glands expelled and a lower back X-ray with no abnormalities. But he seems unable to get to dog door any more in time to poop. Ideas welcome. He does not struggle to squat, either.

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May 5, 20170 found this helpful

Yes, it may have to do with the operation. I'd start with diapers and retraining and if all fails, go to the vet.

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May 22, 2017

I have an almost 1 year old Weimaraner/GSP cross. He is crate trained and goes pee outside and will go to the door when he needs to go out, but he poops inside! If we aren't in the room with him or upstairs and he is down he will poop. We have deep cleaned the areas he goes and try taking him out multiple times a night. But he will run to the door and I will take him out and he will just stand there outside. Then come in and poop. Please help, any suggestions!

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May 23, 20170 found this helpful

Make sure you use an enzyme-based cleaner such as Nature's Miracle. Otherwise, the dog will continue to come back to the same spot. Make sure your dog is on a strict meal and walking schedule. Take the food away between meals.

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February 14, 2017

Recently, my 3 year old dog has been pooping in the house. He's been house trained since he was 2 months old. He's always really good about going outside. He gets let out regularly, but recently he's been pooping inside. Usually he goes in the living room or kitchen right in the open where we can see it. We've recently had a lot of rain, but that's over and it's been sunshine and blue skies. Not even 30 minutes ago he went outside. Peed and pooped, then just pooped on the rug about 10 minutes after he came back inside. He didn't go to the door to be let out, nothing. We haven't had a baby, we haven't moved, there haven't been any big changes in his diet (all solid poops, no diarrhea). When I scold him, I don't hit him or anything. I just show him what he did and in a stern voice ask "What did you do?", never call him bad or anything. Why is he doing this out of nowhere and how can I get him to stop? He's a neutered male Pit Bull Dachshund mix.

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February 17, 20170 found this helpful

He has a kennel, he gets put in there if he'll be alone.

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By 0 found this helpful
January 29, 2017

My Chihuahua Yorkie breed is trained to go outside, but he continues to poop on the beds in the house. It's not just one, it's all three beds that I have. Also his hair is falling out by his bum area, but it feels as if it was shaved but it wasn't.

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January 30, 20171 found this helpful

The hair loss on his bum makes me thing he may have impacted anal glands. They can get infected and cause hair loss from the infection. This is painful for the dog and may be contributing to the pooping on the bed. This is serious and you need a Vet to get things back to normal.

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By 0 found this helpful
April 1, 2017

I have got a lovely natured GSD. She has never been any problem with peeing and pooing in the house. I took her in as a rescue dog at 8 months and she is now nearly 7 years old. She was restless tonight telling me she wanted to go out all the time by going to the front door. So I got up a number of times to let her out, but it was raining outside and she would go out, but come back in within seconds.

After 7 times letting her out I came back into the living room and she went out to the kitchen and emptied her bowels after having 7 chances to go out. I don't know if it was because it was raining, but I have not had this problem with her before. Can anybody help? Why she would do this is very strange for her unless she could hear thunder in the air that I could not hear as their hearing is a lot more powerful than ours.

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April 1, 20170 found this helpful

I would take her to the vet. She may have a urinary tract infection or other physical problem that is causing incontinence.

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By 0 found this helpful
March 20, 2017

I have a 3 year old male Shih Tzu that has started popping in the floor everyday, most of the time in the mornings. I need any advice on how to get him to stop. We have not had any changes. Please help!

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March 20, 20170 found this helpful

You need to take him to the vet to find out if there are any physical reasons for the incontinence.

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By 0 found this helpful
May 10, 2016

I have a 12 month old Cocker Spaniel cross. She was rescued from a puppy farm and while she is lovely, she has been hard work to house train. On the whole she is good and we keep our back door open to give her easy access to the garden where she will pee and poo, though occasionally she will poop in our sitting room on our rug. We are at a loss to understand how to fix this and any suggestions would be really appreciated.

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May 11, 20160 found this helpful
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It's possible she keeps smelling the spot. It's hard to get rid of the smell because a cocker spaniel's sense of smell is 40 times more powerful than a human's.

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By 0 found this helpful
January 31, 2017

My 6 month old Chiweenie puppy is trained to go on pad or go outside to potty every time. I put a rug in the bathroom for my shower and he goes on it. He doesn't go on the living room, kitchen, or rug by my bed that he sits on when I'm cooking. He is not allowed to come in kitchen when I'm cooking. Last night he pooped on top of my comforter. He sleeps under the covers on the bed; he is spoiled rotten lol. Help please.

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February 2, 20170 found this helpful

First of all - most of us spoil our cute pets so you are no exception and just spoiling him is normal.

I certainly agree that your first order of business is to start eliminating the puppy pads (and all the odor/smell left behind).

There are many "experts" on the web to give you professional advice but here is an excellent site that may help you get your baby on track.

http://littledo  py-pads-outside/

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April 3, 20141 found this helpful

We rescued an 8 year old Chihuahua mix. She's been with us 3 weeks. She was outdoor potty and piddle pad trained by the foster mom. She never has an accident peeing, but a couple of times now she's pooped in the house. If she can't get out she uses the piddle pad to pee, but only once has she used the pad to poop. We get her outside often during the day. I'm a little concerned how do I reinforce her to either poop outside or use the pad?

By Louise M.

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April 4, 20140 found this helpful
Best Answer

Scoop up her poop and place it in the area of garden that you would like her to go - leave it there for a while - each time you take her out put her face near the poop to get the scent. After meals is a common time to poop , usually within 1/2 hr with my dog or during exercise.

Never physically punish the wee one as this may already of happened to it and she may fear you. By the look of this wee dog it will be well worth the trouble to keep her - it is adorable & will return the love you give it 10 fold.

Best wishes

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By 1 found this helpful
January 20, 2013

My almost three year old Boxer mix has been housetrained for the last two and a half years with no problems; until now. Over the summer, I let her out to potty, and she happened upon a cat in the shed. Of course, she chased it all over and ran it out of her territory, like every other instance a cat was in the yard. But, this time the cat who was guarding kittens, fought back, and they ended up in quite the tangle before I got them to stop it.

Since then, every time I let her out, she goes straight to the shed instead of doing her business. (No new household members, no medical problems, no moves or anything to stress her.) When I have taken her out, I've leashed her, chained her, tried to reward her with treats, stood with her, everything, but still, she only looks for cats. It's like she has the taste of blood now and that's all she wants. She's also become quite aggressive to other animals, even more so than before. I have no way to keep cats away, but I'm running out of ideas to make her stop.

It doesn't happen during the day much, but every night she potties on the kitchen floor. She knows it's wrong and hides and ducks her head and tail when she knows I am going to see it. I take her out 5+ times a day so she has ample opportunities. I don't have enough space for her to be crated since it has to be such a huge area, and she just jumped over or knocked down the baby gates. I don't want to give up on her because she is a great dog otherwise, but my landlord is going to make me "get rid" of her. I am not in a financial position to move so she has to stop. Any ideas?

I've been told to push her face into her mess and tell her no, then take her outside. That seems cruel to me. I don't want to lose her. She's a member of our family and we love her dearly.

By Ree

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January 25, 20130 found this helpful

My brother has luck with putting disposable baby diapers on his dogs, he said they do urinate in the diaper but won't do the other. Maybe your dog would take to the disposable pee pee pads.

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September 23, 2016

My 11 month old Yorkie, Minnie, is pad trained in the house since winters are too rough on her; she can't take the cold. Lately she has been leaving her poop either on my couch or bed. I don't understand why she all of a sudden started doing this. She would pee no problem on the pad, but never poop on the same pad. So I have been trying to train her to poop on the same pad or a different one, but just pad training to pee on the pad took a long long time and just this week she pooped twice on the couch where I sit a lot and once on the my bed. She does sleep with me in my bed, but had never done this ever before! Why is she doing this?

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February 27, 20170 found this helpful

You may have to go back to crate training her, or else make a point of training her to not do it.

Unless something happened in your home to make her upset, or unless she is sudeenly ill (vet would check for that) most likely what happened is one day she just did it, it seemed easier, she received no feedback from you that it was inappropriate, and the habit stuck.

The thing to do would be to catch her in the act, and with a firm but gentle voice startle her out of it (such as by saying NO!) and then quickly take her to the pad where you want her to defecate.

When she successfully completes the poo, give her praise and a treat.

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By 0 found this helpful
February 26, 2016

I have a Jack Russel who sleeps in the bathroom at night. My parents don't allow dogs in the bedrooms however they do let her inside. She is 7 years old. She is trained to do her business outside as I take her out regularly and tell her to do a wee and stay with her until she does one. It is also routine to go straight before bed. However, occasionally in the mornings we wake up to poo in the bathroom, never pee.

She normally goes into the bathroom around 10pm and is taken out around 6am. I normally feed her dry food in the mornings before 10am. How can I stop her from pooping in the bathroom? I thought this was just a puppy phase and she needed to get used to controlling her bladder and sleeping in the bathroom, but she's an adult now and still continues this habit.

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March 26, 20160 found this helpful

I didn't notice this comment, sorry.

Okay, she's not alone, that's good. What are you feeding her? Foods that create more bulk will make some dogs have to go too frequently. You might try a grain free food on her. Most dogs can "hold it" for eight hours but too much fiber might make her need to go.

My cat goes twice a day on soy-free, grain free food. If your dog goes 4 or more times per day there is too much extra indigestible stuff in the food.

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By 0 found this helpful
May 30, 2016

At this point I'm really not sure what to do. I have a 10 year old pure bred Pug named Cookie. She's trained to do her daily business inside my home on newspaper, due to Pugs having problems with heat that could possibly cause a heat stroke in a very short matter of time.

She's been wonderful doing so since we started training about 2 months after she was born. But recently, she just started pooping and peeing anywhere in the house. Could it possibly be depression? We had another pet Muffin, a Pekingese/Pug mix who has recently passed away going on three months June 11th 2016 due to old age. She was almost 13 years old. They were very, very close. Muffin was 3 years old when we brought Cookie home, and they were inseparable ever since. And once Muffin passed away she became slightly distant, and it just seems like she may of given up on life all together. She's not herself, the baby girl I know. She seems so miserable, and my heart is breaking for her. I don't know if it could be depression, or possibly an illness. I wanted to see if anyone would possibly know what could be happening, before I take her to the vet. I'm not ready for more bad news with my other baby. Please help me.

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June 2, 20160 found this helpful

I would say this is depression. Dogs can grieve for lost companions. Your dog is at a disadvantage. She doesn't see other dogs that often because of your concern about heat would probably keep her from the dog park and such, and because she had a dog companion you probably didn't think to introduce her to many other dogs. Now that her only dog friend is gone she is naturally depressed.

If you don't plan on getting another dog now, socializing her with a neighbor's small dog might be an option. Dogs have "playdates" nowadays. My cat does with the neighbor's Maltese.

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By 0 found this helpful
August 21, 2016

He is a 5 year old neutered male Cocker Spaniel. I adopted him 6/25/16 and he has not had any accidents until recently. I let him out to go many times a day, and even take him to a dog park and he always poops there. Lately, he has had 2 bouts of diarrhea and I understood that he couldn't help it. Yesterday, I let him out and he came back in and pooped in the house. I caught him in the act and yelled at him (he looked ashamed) I put puppy pads down in case he had to go again. Last night (he sleeps in my room) I put down another puppy pad after letting him out, and during the night he pooped in like 10 different spots (not on the pad). When I woke up and stepped in it, he knew he was in trouble. I have him now in the bathroom with his food and water, another puppy pad and I am going to pick up a crate at my mom's today and keep him crated. I don't know what else to do. I yelled at him yesterday and he was so pathetic looking. This morning I just grabbed him and put him in the bathroom. I give him kibble and little pieces of chicken, at first 7 weeks ago, his stool was loose due to the diet change, but has been normal since he got used to it. What should I do?

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August 23, 20161 found this helpful

Your dog is not ashamed when you yell at him, he is afraid. A dog who is afraid is unable to learn. most likely your dog is having a physical problem. I recommend you start with your Vet 1st. I would also be suspicious of the diet change. You might try a kibble for sensitive stomachs. A dog who poops 10 times at night is having a problem somewhere. Can you go back to his original diet just to see if it works? Another possibility is that he is afraid of something outside. Go out with him. It boosts his confidence and gives you a chance to look around and see if there is something bothering him outside. A good long walk on a leash daily might be helpful too. Crating him at night may help, but for sure yelling will not. Good luck to you.

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March 28, 20150 found this helpful

We have a 5 year old American Cocker Spaniel, she was crate trained at 6 months to pee and poo in the guest toilet. Recently she has been pooping all over the house mostly right in front of us and sometimes with guests around. This is very confusing since she still pees in the right place. We changed her food a couple of weeks ago, could this be a reason? Any advise?

By Taniya

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March 29, 20150 found this helpful
Best Answer

Dogs like a regular routine, If you feed them the same time every morning and no snacks between and go with them to toilet for a few weeks they will know what you expect. Have patience and don't yell if they forget. With consistency your dog should be fine.

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By 0 found this helpful
November 28, 2016

I have a two year old Husky/German Shepherd mix who has been potty trained since he was two months old. About six months ago my boyfriend got a job (he was with the dogs all day long before) on a different shift than me, so the dogs are never alone for more than a couple hours a day. Within the last two months or so my Husky has started pooping inside, but when I am home. He gives no warning when he has to go, he'll just get up and walk out of the room and do his business, but only poop.

We haven't changed their diet or their schedule other than my boyfriend getting a job. We go outside (with the command 'outside') as soon as we get up, and they stay outside and play for 20-30 min. then they come back inside and have breakfast. I then take them out again about an hour later. He pees just fine, and he'll show the 'signs' that he's going to poop, but then he gets distracted and plays some more. If I see him get distracted I try to make sure to encourage him to poop and wait for another 10 minutes to see if he'll go, but most of the time he'll go up to the front door to tell me he's done and he wants to go back inside. He's also started this habit of needing to poop at 3 am everyday, pretty consistently for the last week, and he normally only takes one large poop a day.

He was trained really well before this, I don't know how to change his behavior, especially since he's not giving me any warning signs that he has to go.

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January 28, 20170 found this helpful

This sounds like a difficult problem. I'm no expert but it sounds like the change in lifestyle bizarrely set her off. I don't know of any other solution than retraining her.

I assume you have ruled out a medical condition? It's always good to do that.

A good tip comes from the dog whisperers website: https://www.ces  aking-adult-dogs

"Startle, dont scare

If and only if you catch them in the act of eliminating (not 5 minutes later!), clap so that you startle them out of what theyre doing. Then take them outside and offer them praise and treats after they finish eliminating.

Many pet parents have an urge to yell or otherwise scare or punish their dog for eliminating inside, but all this does is make them afraid of you. When that happens, most dogs simply hide from their owners when they need to go.

This is also why you should only startle your dog while theyre actually going inside. If the correction doesnt happen during the misbehavior, they wont make the connection."

Aside from that, it sounds like you're doing everything right in terms of having consistent elimination, walking, etc. the next will be to reinforce her to not go inside

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By 0 found this helpful
July 17, 2016

I have a toy Poodle, 4 years old, and a Cavoodle that is 2. In the last 3 weeks it started. I think the 2 year old is doing poop in my bedroom when I am not home. They sleep with me, but when I am home they go outside to poop. What could be the problem? Could it be anxiety? They are home for long periods. Nothing has changed.

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February 27, 20170 found this helpful

THis does sound like an anxiety issue. YOu might view old Cesar Millan Dog Whisperer episodes to show you how to establish authority over your dogs so they don't feel anxious or territorial

Also, You may have to go back to crate training her, or else make a point of training her to not do it.

Unless something happened in your home to make her upset, or unless she is sudeenly ill (vet would check for that) most likely what happened is one day she just did it, it seemed easier, she received no feedback from you that it was inappropriate, and the habit stuck.

The thing to do would be to catch her in the act, and with a firm but gentle voice startle her out of it (such as by saying NO!) and then quickly take her to the pad where you want her to defecate.

When she successfully completes the poo, give her praise and a treat.

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By 0 found this helpful
November 4, 2015

We got our 3 year old Rat Terrier rescue during the summer when our back door was always open, and he pooped and peed in the yard like a champ. Now that it's rainy and cold, he's pooping in the house and damaging the carpet. It's unacceptable. This is Seattle, it rains all the time. He is put outside to go plenty of times during the day, for long periods of time, especially after eating. I don't know what to do with him. Do I need to keep him kenneled any time he's in the house?

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November 9, 20150 found this helpful

Have you tried using disposable "pee-pee pads"? My dog had the same issue, he wouldn't pee or poop outside if it was raining or if it had snowed. Last winter I almost gave him away, I was just so over mopping up dog pee and picking up dog $hit ALL DAY, EVERY DAY for 2 weeks until the snow finally melted! I bought these dog training/house-breaking "pee pee pads" (I think the brand was called Bulls-Eye) that have a pheromone in them that is supposed to attract the dog to it, making them (hopefully) want to do their business on the pad instead of on the carpet or hardwood floor. They were a steal at Kroger - marked down for clearance @ $2.50 for a 30 count bag!!! I bought all six bags left on the shelf lol. I will admit - it took my dog three days to learn to pee ON the pad - instead of AROUND the pad (he's not too bright) but it was worth it. Now - just in case - I keep two pee-pee pads on the floor where he would usually pee/poop. It is so much easier - and much cleaner - to simply pick up the soiled pad, toss it in the trash outside, and put down a clean pad or two. The pads don't leak, (they didn't for me, anyway) and so your carpet and home won't smell like dog $hit anymore. Just make sure you check the pad often, replacing when needed, and praise/reward the dog when he uses the pad instead of the carpet.

As soon as the ground outside was dry again, I encouraged my dog to do his business outside...so he didn't think that he was supposed to use the training pads 24/7.

Good Luck!!!

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By 1 found this helpful
August 21, 2013

I have two male Boxers that are very territorial. We got a new dog about 3 years ago, everything was fine until he hit puberty and that's when the problems started. The Boxers had been potty trained for 4 years, they started marking territory and fighting so badly that we eventually decided to give the new dog to a different family. Since then we have moved and it has only gotten worse. They pee on the bed if you leave the door open. They were left for 30 minutes with the back door open and they peed right next to the open back door. I'm pretty sure they are mad that I'm leaving, but the peeing everywhere has got to stop. I was thinking about going back to kennel training like when they were puppies, but I'm not sure if that is the right thing to do. What do you guys think?

By Jade S.

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August 23, 20130 found this helpful

First, a question - are your male Boxers intact or have you had them neutered? If intact you need to get them to the vet to be checked for bladder issues common to intact older Boxers.

If they're neutered, though, while a vet check (just in case) is a very good idea, you may have hit the problem on the head - they are mad at you for leaving them and making other changes in their routine.

I raised AKC Boxers from childhood (late '50s) until 2008 in the US. They are wonderful dogs (but then again, aren't all dogs wonderful:) but they do have some breed-specific 'issues' like using toileting to let you know they aren't happy. A move, the loss of a fur-sib, a return to work of a human who has been home with them all day and night, all of these (and more) changes can cause the ultra-intelligent Boxer to work-out a way to let you know they aren't happy.

By all means, crate them when you can't be there with them; crate them any time they need to be contained and controlled.

While it is tempting to put them in the same crate together, don't. Each Boxer should have his/her own crate. You can put the crates right up against each other so they can have comforting closeness, but don't ever try to put two territorial Boxers into the same crate. Ever.

Make sure the crates are large enough for them to stand and turn, and consider draping a blanket across and over the back end of each crate to create a den-like atmosphere. Make sure the water dispenser or bowl can't be flipped over and also ensure there is something like a Kong toy or a top-quality chewie in their crates to keep them occupied while you're out.

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January 21, 20140 found this helpful

My boyfriend just rescued an 8 year old Shih Tzu from someone we know. They took the dog from someone that was going to put her down. He has only had her for a week. She will pee outside, but has pooped in the house twice. She is also not eating her dry food.

I talked to the people who had her before him, and they said she would eat just about anything. I was thinking that maybe she is just being picky, or that it is her new environment. I tried mixing the dry food with the wet. She will pick out the wet and eat it. After a while when the dry food was in the liquid of the wet food, she did eat some of it.

I was wondering if anyone had any helpful tips or tricks? Thanks in advance!

By Brandi

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January 23, 20140 found this helpful
Best Answer

My sister's poodle would only eat wet food or dry food that had sat in water. She took it to the vet and found out the dog had infected teeth. Maybe that's why your dog will only eat the wet food. I would have her teeth checked.

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