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Adult Dog Pees in Crate

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Despite the assurances that a dog will not poop or pee in their crate, this does happen for a number of reasons. This is a page about adult dog pees in crate.
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October 11, 20090 found this helpful

Olly we have had just 2 weeks, he is very good in the home and his manners. He is crate trained, but barks now at 5:30. When I go down to let him out he has wet in his bed and it is still warm.

We have got him in a routine as we had him barking and howling at night, but ignoring him has been achieved and now we are left with him wetting in the morning. As soon as I hear him barking I go down, but I think he is barking either to tell us he has done it or to go, but with excitement. Then he has already done it. Help.

By nancy marris from Dinnington Sheffield, UK

Answers

October 11, 20090 found this helpful

If you stay up till midnight or later let him out the last thing before you go to bed. This might help to reset his body clock. Another thing you might want to consider is getting up at 4:30 to let him out. Or if you make a potty run in the middle of the night have him go too.

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October 11, 20090 found this helpful

I was going to make a suggestion similar to MartyD's. If Olly wakes you at 5:30 and he had already peed in his crate (it's still warm/fresh), why not set your alarm to get up at 5:00 and hopefully that'll be early enough to let him out? I imagine you're not thrilled at getting up even earlier (I wouldn't be!), but it seems this would be easier than waiting for him to wake you at 5:30 with a mess in his crate that you need to clean up.

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If getting up a little earlier to get to him before he pees in his crate works, I wonder if you might eventually be able to gradually shift it later. Like do 5:00 (or 4:30) for a while. Once that's going well, maybe try 10 minutes later for a while. And so on. Best of luck with Olly!

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October 13, 20090 found this helpful

I didn't see mention of the dogs age, if he's fairly young, you need to step up potty training. Make sure he goes before going to his crate. If he's into his crate early, say before 10-11pm, you may have to give him a potty break during the night. If my dog wakes up when I got to the bathroom in the middle of the night, then i know she needs to go again. Getting up a bit earlier may help too

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October 13, 20091 found this helpful

Everyone's advice has been good, but a few things haven't been mentioned. Perhaps your crate is too large for your dog. The whole crate training premise is based on the fact that a dog does not like to soil the place where he sleeps. That said do not allow him to get to a place where this becomes normal as the dog will get to the point where it won't be a big deal to urinate in the crate.

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While crate training limit liquid intake to nothing 3 hours before bed time and depending on the age of the dog he should not be crated more then 8 hours at a time.

When my dog was crate training I would not leave him in his crate for more then 4 hours at a time during the process. I also found that having his crate in the bedroom with me at night made it much easier to hear and respond to his needs. A dog will not always bark loudly when needing to go out. A lot of the time it will start with little whines and whimpers. By the time they are barking and howling the need is great and they are very uncomfortable.

I hope this helps you. I read many sites with my dogs but the best info I got was from others past experiences. Good Luck.

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October 14, 20090 found this helpful

Be sure to take him out to the bathroom before he goes to sleep for the night. Also be sure you don't keep him in the crate too many hours before letting him out again to go to the bathroom.

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Dogs usually need to go as soon as they wake up. If he's going in his crate, it would seem he's in there too long.

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By 0 found this helpful
June 15, 2019

Our 2 year old dog, that we've had since he was a puppy, is still peeing in his crate. We crate him anytime we're gone from the house, but never over 8 hours (work, errands, etc.). It's not everyday that he pees, just some days. He's always been crated and was house broken just fine. We exercise and feed him regularly, the crate isn't "too big", we don't leave anything in the crate (bed, towels, toys, etc.). He does have separation anxiety, clearly, and is also on Prozac. What on earth can we do to mitigate this problem?

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June 16, 20190 found this helpful

8 hours is too long to expect a dog to not relieve himself. Could you go that long? You might want to invest in a dog walker.

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June 16, 20190 found this helpful

You may want to talk to your vet about two things--one is to make sure he does not have a urinary tract infection or bladder stones (the latter causes intermittent pee accidents) and if he gets a clean bill of health about re-dosing the Prozac or seeing if you can add pheromones or something additional to the treatment.

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If it is separation anxiety, this can cause all kinds of behavior and sadly, peeing their crate is one of them. 8 hours in a crate is not that long for most dogs. It's not ideal, but usually as they get older, pups can "hold it" for 8-10 hours as they mostly sleep.

It is also really important to keep him on a strict schedule which give him cues of when it is OK to pee--like get home, take him out, praise heavily when he pees. Take him out before bed time, praise heavily when he pees. Take him out right before he goes in the crate, praise heavily when he pees and repeat.

Post back with an update! Prayers for the pup and for you. I know how frustrating this can be for you and for the pup. There are answers. Sometimes it just takes time to get it all to line up and get resolved.

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June 17, 20190 found this helpful

It might help to get a very large two door crate. It is a wire crate and it has a section where the pet can relieve itself, that is not in the area where the pet lays or sleeps. I have one for my cat, when it is outside. They are great. Put a potty pad in the other part of the crate.

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---Robyn

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By 0 found this helpful
September 1, 2018

I have an 11 year old dog that only pees in her kennel if there is bedding in it. It can be a towel, doggy bed, etc., but if it is just the plastic crate bottom nothing. She does not pee in the house and sleeps with us at night and we have no issues. What the heck is going on and how to I fix it?

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September 1, 20180 found this helpful

I would check with the vet. It may be a symptom of old age or an infection

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September 2, 20180 found this helpful

Ask the vet just to be sure this is not a health issue, but since she is only peeing in one place in one situation, it sounds like a behavioral issue that she is trying to mark items in her crate as her own. Like she already feels like the other places are hers (no pee) but the crate covers aren't (pees).

The vet is good with BH problems also...but I would look to see what it is with her crate that she feels the need to mark the things you put in it. Is there a cat or another dog who goes in there sometimes and she is trying to tell him or her to stay away? Have the items you are been putting in there already been peed on by another member of the fur family?

Please let us know what you figure out and what the vet says!

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By 0 found this helpful
October 1, 2015

I have taken in a now 1 year old pup. When I got her she was maybe 8-9 months. She was not crate trained correctly. The owner let her pee on the pee pad in the crate all the time. And she would not pee outside when taken out, she thought it was play time. She would only pee when she wanted to outside. I have since trained her to pee outside right away. But now I have the problem of her peeing inside the crate when I'm not home. How do I stop this?

Answers

October 23, 20170 found this helpful

This isn't going to be easy:

  1. The dog was trained to pee in her crate from the time she was a small puppy.
  2. You didn't get the dog until it was almost 9 months old.
  3. Your dog now has the habit and believe it is fine to pee in the crate anytime it wants.
  4. You will need to remove everything from the crate.
  5. Before you put the dog in the crate and are ready to leave the dog must go outside and pee.
  6. Before you leave I wouldn't give the dog any water and make sure she pees outside several times before putting her in the crate.
  7. Each time she pees in the crate tell her she is a bad dog and this isn't acceptable.
  8. If she doesn't pee in the crate then you can reward her with a treat.
  9. Be patient, this will take time because your dog feels it is fine to pee in her crate.
  10. You will have to let her know this isn't the correct behavior.
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