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Homemade Hummingbird Food Recipes

Hummingbird food can go bad quickly. So it is important to change it often. Store bought foods can be expensive and contain dyes that are not good for birds. This page contains homemade hummingbird food recipes.
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June 2, 2016

Making your own hummingbird food is easy and much cheaper than buying the concentrate. Plus you can make it without the red dye, as it is generally unnecessary for attracting hummingbirds to your feeder.

Supplies:

  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 cups water
  • sauce pan
  • stove
  • clean bottle (for storing leftovers)
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Steps:

  1. Combine sugar and water in a sauce pan.
  2. Bring to a boil. This will help kill any bacteria or mold. Then remove from heat and allow to cool completely.
  3. Fill your feeder with hummingbird food and store the leftover food in the refrigerator. Note: I recommend labeling your storage container to avoid confusion as to what it is. My son poured a huge glass of it, thinking it was cold water. :)
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  5. Hang up the feeder and enjoy your tiny feathered friends!
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Comment Was this helpful? 1

By 7 found this helpful
October 17, 2011

After attending several lectures by the Hummingbird Bird expert in Christoval, TX (that feeds 3 1/2 gallons of food per day), I have learned some helpful information regarding feeding hummers. The mixture is 3 parts water to 1 part sugar. There is no need to boil the water, just use hot water, mix and stir. Add a tiny drop of red food coloring (so you can see when it is empty).

Do not remove feeders in fall, as the passing through hummers are looking for food. They will leave when they are ready and should. In hot weather, the food spoils quickly.

By jbennett from San Angelo, TX

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By 4 found this helpful
October 16, 2011

I have always used one part sugar to four parts water and it works for me. Clean out your feeder every time you change the food and you will eventually get hummingbirds. Some suggest boiling the water and then adding the sugar, but I find it is not necessary. I just use the hottest tap water and add the sugar and it works just as well.

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By Elaine S. from Near Cedar Rapids, IA

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July 18, 2014

This mixture can be stored in the refrigerator for about 1 week.

Source: My awesome friend Richard Wildermuth

Supplies:

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 4 cups water

Steps:

  1. Bring water to a boil then add sugar, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved
  2. Cool to room temperature then fill feeders

A few drops of red food coloring will tint nectar to attract birds.

Comment Was this helpful? 1

September 20, 20160 found this helpful

This is a guide about canning homemade hummingbird food. One way to have homemade hummingbird nectar on hand whenever you need it, is to make large batches and can it.

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August 3, 20140 found this helpful

This is a guide about feeding hummingbirds. These beautiful birds enjoy a liquid feeder. Most red flowers will invite hummers to your garden.

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Questions

Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

By 0 found this helpful
April 18, 2011

Is it OK to substitute stevia for sugar in hummingbird nectar?

By Amber from southern Ontario, Canada

Answers

April 18, 20110 found this helpful
Best Answer

I would not do that! The sugar provides calories for energy, and stevia is popular with humans as it is so low calorie. Also, it may not be metabolized safely by the hummers. Stick with ordinary table sugar.

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April 25, 20110 found this helpful
Best Answer

No! Stevia is a sweetener for couch potatoes who can't resist sweets; it has almost no calorie value for hummingbirds, who work and need energy. Even greener stevia is close to calorie-free.
And yes, avoid the 'safe' food colors. Color the feeder.

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April 25, 20110 found this helpful
Best Answer

No. What is this latest " let me feed some phony stuff to the hummers. I'd love to fool them"? Hummers need sugar water. Always have, always will. If they have flowers for nectar they prefer them. In the season when they cannot get enough nectar, we help them to survive with sugar water. Please be kind and feed what is needed.

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September 6, 20131 found this helpful

How much sugar do I add to 2ltrs of water to feed my hummingbirds?

By D

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By 0 found this helpful
August 29, 2011

When making hummingbird nectar at home, my solution turns golden before it comes to a boil. Is it being burned? I used medium-high heat and it takes forever to come to a boil (electric ceramic stovetop). Any suggestions?

By Mary D.

Answers

August 29, 20110 found this helpful

If you are using sugar, it could be that the sugar is being caramelized. I have a glass top stove, and mine using an on/off cycle to cook. The important question is; do the hummers like it? Have you tasted it yourself? If it tastes OK to you and hummers are drinking it, I wouldn't worry.

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August 29, 20110 found this helpful

Another question might be your ratio, are you using a 1 to 4 ratio? One cup sugar to 4 cups water is what is usually recommended.

When we make hummer food we put a cup of sugar in a metal pot, add 2 cups of water, bring it to a slow boil, stir it a bit with a spoon, take the pot off the heat and add the other 2 cups of water.

We let it cool pretty much completely before we put it in a feeder. We try to keep a good bit in a pot at all times. If we fill up a feeder and use up the juice we make more immediately and let it set until the next filling. We also rotate feeders (we have 3) and clean them each time we bring in an empty one. Sometimes we have to scrub them because they start getting a bit of mold. But we "at least" rinse them out thoroughly when we bring one in from outside.

The only time the fluid gets color is when they have set outside for a while. The water gets foggy and the birds won't eat it. This usually happens at the beginning of spring when only one or two hummers have arrived. When summer is in full swing we have no worries about foggy water (we're too busy trying to keep feed in them :)

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August 30, 20110 found this helpful

Are you using 1 cup of sugar to 4 cups of water the equivalent? I put mine in a 4 cup pyrex measuring cup and microwave it for at least 3 minutes. Stir once about half way through. Then let it sit for a minute or two before opening the microwave. Voila! Hummingbird food.

Let it cool and fill the feeder. Left over food goes into the fridge for the next time. I got this recipe and the directions from my avian vet.

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August 30, 20110 found this helpful

I make my own hummingbird food by putting 1cup of water in the microwave for 2 minutes or until it boils. I then stir in 1/3 c. of sugar until it dissolves. I let it cool completely then fill the feeder. I have a regular flock of hummers at the feeder.

I clean the feeder once a week with hot water and a bottle brush. If the weather is really hot, I clean it before I refill it every other day. It will ferment when the weather is scorching. I really don't want a bunch of drunken hummers dive bombing me :0)

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June 16, 20120 found this helpful

Some friends are using a mixture (of what I call harmful) of 1 cup sugar to 1 cup water. This does really attract the birds, but I know that it must be very harmful for the birds. Am I correct?

By Joan from Signal Mtn., TN

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August 7, 20110 found this helpful

Is using red food coloring in homemade nectar harmful to the hummingbirds?

By Betty

Answers

August 8, 20110 found this helpful

It can be; and it is not necessary. Save your food color, all you need is sugar and water! Four parts water to one part sugar. It is best if you can wash your feeder every night, let it dry, refill and put it out again; helps to keep the molds and fungi at bay (which can be harmful to the birds).

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August 8, 20110 found this helpful

Ditto Jilson. I make my mix stronger, 2 cups of water to 1 cup sugar. They like it better. This is the time of year when they will start to fatten for their long trip south. If you watch them at the feeder, you can see them gain weight. It starts as a lump near the tail and then fills in up their backs. There will come a day when they will come in to feed heavily, fly up in a circle and head south. Males leave first, then the females and then the young so keep your feeder up until well after you are sure they are all gone.

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August 12, 20110 found this helpful

Yes, red dye can be harmful to the Hummers. It can cause mouth and throat cancer. The red color on the feeders is enough to attract them no need for colored sugar water.

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August 12, 20110 found this helpful

Yes, it is. They don't need it to attract them anyway. Your feeder has enough color to get their attention. Make your own solution without the red coloring.

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August 13, 20110 found this helpful

I agree, and love my hummers! They don't need the red dye. Usually they come to my home in the middle of April for early birds I start putting my feeders out by the first week in April, no red dye but I do add a large red bow to my shepherd's hook for symbolic reasons I think like the song "tie a yellow ribbon around the old oak tree" ) I sing to my hummers (hehe) it's been one whole year and I do miss thee (hehe)

I read once in Birds n Bloom that the same hummers will come back to your yard every year, anyone else read that? Also I read that hummers can fly 500 miles without stopping, wow, now that's a strong little flyer! :)

@ Chloelizabeths comment: I was thinking the other day about making my mix a little stronger too. I'll try yours after all your only adding a 1/2 cup more and if they didn't like it you can be sure they won't drink it and yours are so thank you that's what I will do with my next batch. I love my hummers and soon will be missing them!

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August 13, 20110 found this helpful

I agree with those who say no red or any color dye. Hummers can see the clear solution. I disagree about the amount of sugar to water ratio. Hummers also need protein they get by catching small flying insects (gnats, etc.). If too much sugar is in the solution, they may not feel the need to catch the nutrients/protein since they have empty calories.

I read this in Birder's Magazine. The recommended ratio is 1/3 cup sugar to 1 cup water. Too much sugar can also lead to other problems. You can go to Wikipedia or a birders web site to confirm this.

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By 0 found this helpful
September 14, 2007

Does diluted pancake syrup make ok hummingbird food?

Answers

September 14, 20070 found this helpful

I would say no, only for the reason that it's full of preservatives and such. I do know that Hummingbird "food" is sold in the stores, WalMart and such.

Here is a recipe I found on-line, sounds a lot like the one my Grandmother used to use, but at that time they used the red food dye (it also helped us kids, we knew not to drink the bright red drink in the fridge!).
Hummingbird Nectar Recipe

1 part sugar/4 parts water

Boil the water first, then measure and add sugar, at the rate of 1/4 cup of sugar to 1 cup of water.

Let cool and store excess in refrigerator until ready to use.

Do not add food coloring, honey (which ferments), or artificial sweetener, which has no nutritional value.

You will need to clean your feeder every few days, with hot water and a mild (10%) bleach solution to inhibit mold. Rinse thoroughly before refilling with water syrup.

Hope that helps.

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By guest (Guest Post)
September 19, 20070 found this helpful

Michawnpita is correct. This is the recipe that I have used for many years. I boil the water for it gets the chlorine out and any impurities. Do not add color for it is bad for them. Do a Google on hummingbirds and it will tell you. We love watching the sweet little birds. They are outside if our slidding glass door and we watch them while sitting at our dining room table.

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By guest (Guest Post)
September 19, 20070 found this helpful

NO! Use only a mixture of sugar and water as given above.

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By guest (Guest Post)
September 19, 20070 found this helpful

An easy way to make hummingbird food: 1 cup water, 1/4 sugar, in a glass measuring cup. Microwave to a boil, and boil until sugar is dissoved. Cool. The ratio is 4 to 1. If this is the first time you've fed hummingbirds at that location, add some red coloring to the mix. Once they become used to looking for the feeder, you won't need to color it anymore.

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June 24, 20130 found this helpful

On the nectar you buy in the store, the package directions say 3 parts water to 1 part water. What are they meaning? 3 cups water to 1 cup of nectar? Please help me clarify this. I'm not sure what that means? Can anyone help asap?

By Christina

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February 27, 20131 found this helpful

My hummingbird nectar (4 parts water to one part sugar) gets moldy after about one week. Am I doing something wrong or is this normal and what can I do to prevent it?

By Deborah

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By 0 found this helpful
May 23, 2011

Is is OK to substitute brown sugar for white sugar in nectar?

By Bridgitte J

Answers

May 23, 20110 found this helpful

Brown sugar contains molasses, whereas white sugar doesn't. I would stick with white sugar only.

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May 23, 20110 found this helpful

Agree with MCW. I have herd of other people asking about substituting white cane sugar in hummingbird feeders and many people say don't do it. Someone asked about using sugar substitutes like Sweet and Low. Others have asked about using honey. The answer is always the same... stick to normal sugar and water at a 1 cup sugar to 4 cups water ratio.

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May 31, 20110 found this helpful

Substitutions of any kind kill. Good white sugar and water only. I use 4 to 1. I have a few that winter over so I use 3 to 1 for winter months. I shine a light on the feeder to keep it from freezing. I adore my hummers. Would never substitute and kill them.

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May 25, 20120 found this helpful

Why does my hummingbird food turn cloudy during the cool down time. I've been making it for years with the same sugar and bottled spring water. They don't like city water even after we boiled it. Now it is turning cloudy even before it's cooled. What do I need to change?

By Dan T.

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April 18, 20110 found this helpful

What happens if you put too much sugar in the water to make the nectar? Can it harm the birds?

By Phyl from MD

Answers:

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

We did that once. The hummingbird passed out. We found him on the ground and put him in a safe place. Later he recovered and flew off. Too much sugar is not good for the little guys. (08/21/2010)

By foxrun41

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I have made it stronger than recommended many times, without any problems. Just don't use red food color, that is not needed. Also, don't leave the same sugar water in more than a few days, it starts to grow bacteria and molds/fungi that can be harmful to the birds. Be sure to wash your feeder before refilling, rinsing it very well. Also, the bulk of a hummingbird's diet is insects! The sugar water/nectar is enjoyed for energy, but they get nutrition from other sources. (08/21/2010)

By Jilson

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

You can add water appropriately to get a more balanced mix. The ratio should be 4 to 1, i.e. 4 cups water to 1 cup of sugar. And the water does not have to be hot to add more water, it would need to be reheated to add more sugar. (08/21/2010)

By Suntydt

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

Recipes for hummingbird nectar call for a water to sugar ratio of 4:1. But some people who keep hummingbird feeders insist on making stronger concentrates either from the belief that more is better, or they mix a stronger solution only in late summer and autumn under a widespread, but misguided belief that this will "fatten 'em up" for their migration.

The unwavering rule is: "Never mix nectar stronger than the 4:1 ratio, or you may be doing injury to the hummingbirds." A friend who refused to believe her old practice was harmful finally changed her policy (of providing stronger autumn concentrates) when I wrote her the following commentary.

I doubt you're doing great harm since late-season hummers will be transient visitors and won't eat often of the unhealthy concentrate. You'd hurt them more giving them too concentrated a nectar when they are nesting, as they'd be using nearby feeders too regularly during that time. But overly sugared nectar can be harmful at any time if too often encountered, and in no case does increasing the ratio strengthen them for their winter journey. Here's an overview of why it's bad for their health:

Sugar water may supplement hummingbird diet, but if they are so fond of sugar water that they neglect their natural diet of flower nectar and small insects, they will become deficient in scores of minuet, but essential nutrients. Too much sugar might actually hamper their search for the more appropriate natural nectars. Ideally sugar-water feeders are not the only things the hummers find in a garden which will be full of trumpet-shaped spring and summer flowers, or for summer and autumn such things as sage-blossoms, especially in reds, either planted in the garden or set about in pots. Providing potted plants in autumn bloom would be much more of an energy-boost than more concentrated sugarwater for their autumn/winter journey. A big abelia will be in full flower through all of autumn, a favorite for hummingbirds that are still hanging about.

Some hummers actually reject over-sugared artificial nectars, and good thing they do since it is unhealthy for them. But others will favor feeders with the most sugar in the water and they may come from greater distances from their nests to feed, overlooking more healthful flower-sources along the way, knowing where they can get the bigger, but mineral-deficient sugar load. These hummers become sickly and neglect their nests and are away from their nests too long at a stretch.

Those hummingbirds fed too much sugar can develop calcium deficiencies, muscular weakness, and bone malformations similar to rickets. Their eggs are apt to be soft-shelled and will not hatch. Some hummingbirds appear to show signs of illness resembling drunkenness when feeders contain too much sugar.

Over sugaring their nectar also encourages rapid bacterial growth in the feeders and will attract bees, wasps, and bee-flies.

Too much water is less harmful than too much sugar, though both can be harmful, as too little sugar could cause some hummers to not get their daily caloric requirement.

(08/23/2010)

By foxrun41

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I have always had more hummingbirds at my feeders than everyone else until they switch to my ways. The very first feeder I hang out in early spring (before seeing any hummingbirds) I use a 1 to 4 part sugar/water (no food color). As soon as I see a couple of hummingbirds at the feeder I switch to a 1 to 5 part sugar/water. Hummingbirds return to the same feeders each year. If they drank from your feeder last year and you don't have it out in time you will see them buzzing around that same spot looking for the feeder. By not getting it out early in the spring you will lose some of your impatient little customers to other feeding sources. Putting it out early keeps the same ones coming back and also helps to add new hummingbirds each year. Also putting 2 feeders out helps. They tend to prefer zooming back and forth as opposed to staying at just one feeder. (10/22/2010)

By Innovativemom

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August 21, 20100 found this helpful

With regards to the hummingbird feeders they say no red dye, do they mean red food coloring?

By Kimberly from Tenmile, OR

Answers:

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

Correct! You don't need anything more than sugar and water for the nectar. The feeder's red parts, or a red fake flower or even a piece of ribbon will catch their eye. Once they know the feeder is there, they will happily patronize your little "cafe" with clear nectar. (05/15/2010)

By Jilson

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

Our feeder came with instructions on making the nectar. 1 cup sugar to 4 cups water. No dye needed. Our feeder is red with little yellow flowers to feed from. Our first hummingbird showed up last week so now is the time to get the feeders out (at least in Tennessee). (05/15/2010)

By Suntydt

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

We usually put one drop of red food color in the first feeder filling for the year. This year we tried something different. I noticed that the mandarin oranges come in a red netting. We used the netting to cover the feeder. We only have the hummers from March until August, but certainly enjoy them while they are here. We have an 8 hole feeder and have had 16 hummers feeding (2 per hole) and a cloud waiting their turn. We have a one quart feeder and fill it nearly every day.

From Corrie on the Olympic Peninsula, WA (05/18/2010)

By tazfan56

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May 15, 20100 found this helpful

If you are like we are, we have several hummingbird feeders around our yard. Yes, you can buy the hummingbird food, but this get costly and there is not much in the packages. I labeled a pitcher to keep in the refrigerator with "homemade hummingbird food". This is so much cheaper than the purchased kind.

Bring 4 cups water to a boil and stir in 1 cup sugar. Stir to dissolve. When cool, pour into the pitcher and refrigerate until needed. As I refill the feeders, I make another batch for the next time. You do not need to add food coloring. In fact, I understand it is not good for the little hummingbirds.

By Jodi from Gary, TX

Answers:

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

We have lots of hummingbirds. I start off the season with a 1 sugar to 4 water, boiled a few minutes to make sure the sugar has changed. Never use honey. Later on, I go to a 1 to 5 ratio as it is closest to nature's syrup in flowers. Aren't they amazing little birds? I just love them. (03/19/2007)

By SunnyBC88

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

It is "not" okay to use a red dye in hummingbird food just because it is FDA approved. Red dye is cancer causing, especially if a lot of it is used and very often. Think of a hummingbird's size. Just a little bit of the red dye will overpower the little bird's liver.

Please do not use red dye.

Aimee, Master Herbalist student (07/09/2007)

By Aimee

hummingbird food

I have always, always been told and read that hummingbird food mixture is 4 to 1. That would be 1C of water to 1/4 cup of sugar. For larger amounts 4 to 1 could mean 4C of water to 1C sugar. Too much sugar kills and/or rots their beaks. (04/09/2008)

By Marigold Mama

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I would think that even using just plain sugar without the color would be detrimental to the health of hummingbirds. I contains none of the trace minerals and vitamins that natural nectar contains. So, wouldn't it be better to use a pre-made mix? I want to attract hummingbirds, not kill them. (04/18/2008)

By Jim

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

Last year, I didn't boil my water and it didn't seem to cause any issues. However I read that the reason you boil the water is to reduce the amount of chlorine which is harmful to hummingbirds. I am going to start boiling it this year as our water is very chlorinated. (04/22/2008)

By Stephanie

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I read this on Wikipedia:

Other things to avoid using in feeders include artificial sweeteners and non-nutritive sweeteners such as saccharin (Sweet'N Low), aspartame (Equal), sucralose (Splenda), and stevia. Though hummingbirds might drink feeder solutions containing these sugar substitutes, they will be starved of the calories they need to sustain their metabolism.

So I would suggest sticking to plain white sugar, or better yet plant a hummingbird friendly garden. If your friend wants the hummers near a window how about a hanging basket full of fuchsias? (05/01/2008)

By Bonita

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

No red dye, buy a red feeder.
(05/03/2008)

By Debbie

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I have used for years the 4 to 1 and it works great. I put a little bit of red Kool Aid in my water to color it and it seems to work fine.

I so love to watch these little birds they are great and fun to watch. (05/29/2008)

By Elizabeth

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

Obviously you don't need dyes, And the FDA will tell you just about anything. Then recant their statement and say its gonna kill you. Like everyone has said either boil the water to extract chlorine or let stand 24 hrs that's what I do. And no red dyes. (05/29/2008)

By BK

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I ran across this pretty quickly doing a search to see what is recommended about replacing some of the sugar with corn syrup. I haven't found a credible answer yet, but some postings here concern me.

Do not use food coloring. Even if the jury is still out about the effect on the birds, it does absolutely nothing to make them want to use the feeder or the food you make. Why risk it?
Boiling the water is not optional. It either needs done or it doesn't depending on your supply.
It is unneeded to dissolve the small concentration of sugar. But if there is danger of pathogens or mold it must be done. Know your water and know your sugar. Boiling flashes off chlorine, which may or may not be harmful, but many other chemicals can be concentrated by boiling. This danger is real for you as well as the birds you like to watch. As a rule well water should be safe. (07/17/2008)

By Ray the hummer watcher

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I use the same formula, but without the red I do not attract the birds. But by mixing the juices of strawberries and raspberries to the mixture they have been coming in droves. A pleasure to watch. (08/04/2008)

By Michel Emond

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

The red water makes absolutely no difference. We have always used plain unboiled water and white sugar. Just a reminder, the sugar water is for energy only, they get their nutrition other ways. Also, I've noticed that our feeders with perches are most more popular. They don't expend precious energy hovering and tend to hang around the feeder a few extra seconds. (08/19/2008)

By Njjan

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I don't know if it hurts them or not, but I do know that it makes a difference with or without the red coloring. I ran an experiment by placing one with on one side of my yard, and one without on the other and then switched them the next day. They fought over the one with the red coloring, and hardly a one came to the one without. I'm not for or against the coloring, just stating a fact. Try it for yourself. By the way, it was purchased mix at Walmart. I didn't put the food coloring in myself. (09/09/2008)

By Joan

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

Everyone seems to have what they say works for them when in reality, no one really knows the long term effects of natural sugar, unboiled water or red food color. Why not try the original idea? Buy hummingbird food from the store. Yes, it costs more than if you make it yourself, but stores have used it for years and years. It has already been tested and proven. (09/29/2008)

By Sharon

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food and a live HB nest web site..1 baby

Two years ago we began feeding hummingbirds. We used the store bought red stuff. I sat out every afternoon and evening and didn't see any hummingbirds. My hubby told me to give up we don't have any here. I said no. I want to see one. I can't give up yet. So every 3 days I put out new nectar and washed the feeders. Then I ran out, so I found the recipe to make my own on the internet.

  • Summer: 1 part sugar to 4 parts water - boil for one minute, cool, and fill feeder.

  • August to November: 1 part sugar to 3 parts water - boil one minute, cool, and fill feeders.

And I'm telling you after 10 minutes of the clear nectar being in there I saw my first hummer. I was so excited I couldn't breathe. When it left I called in to tell my husband and I could barely speak. I have made my own ever since.

Check out this site and bookmark it; a live close up hummingbird nest. I think this is last clutch of the season. I have watched her for 2 years. This nest is in California.

cam.dellwo.com

(05/28/2009)

By Ariela

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

I am just starting the hummingbird feeder in the back yard. I used to feed them 50 years ago and didn't remember the recipe. We always used the red dye. I consulted this web site to gain the sugar water ratio and learned its no longer acceptable to use the dye. I wanted to attract the birds so I added beet juice and got wonderful red color. Once the birds are established with the feeder I can stop the beet juice. (08/09/2009)

By llqfishbrew

Make Your Own Hummingbird Food

Be sure to use non-chlorinated, non-fluoridated water to make the solution. These water additives aren't good for wildlife (plants or animals). (08/18/2009)

By elisebtx

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May 26, 20060 found this helpful
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