Frugal Living Advice

Reading advice from others who live a frugal lifestyle can be helpful in developing one of your own. This guide contains frugal living advice.
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19 found this helpful
September 22, 2011 Flag

I've been thinking a lot about the world and the terrible state we are in. One thing I've been thinking is that we would all be a lot better off if we didn't say "someone ought to do something" and said "I'm going to do something" instead.

I think we have to stop leaving it to the government to help other people. Sure, there are a lot of people who could do more to help themselves, but an awful lot of people are trying really hard to just survive. Until I have walked in their shoes, I can't know enough to judge them.

I know one thing. If all of us decided that we were going to do whatever we could to help other people, and an awful lot of problems would be solved. I know that's never going to happen. But what if just 10% of us decided to do something?

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I am crocheting warm, attractive winter hats and scarves to donate to the needy. It's a little thing. Most of us can do little things to help. Give time to a charity, visit old folks in a nursing home. Some of us can afford to give financially.

Maybe some people could afford to buy things at the thrift shop when they go. A nice white button down shirts for someone who has a job interview coming up. Good winter coats for needy kids. If one person bought a winter coat once a month, 12 kids will be warm enough to go to school. That's doing something!

Think about what churches could be doing. I live outside of Cleveland, Ohio, a very poor town. I am sure there are at least a few hundred churches around here. Here is my pet project for them; having worked for many years with delinquent, mentally ill teenage girls, I know that the foster care system is badly broken.

If a church would say; we have 3 families, an older couple, and a single man who will foster kids because all of us in this church are committed to helping them. We will babysit for them so they have time off. We will teach their fosters new life skills. We will be mentors. We will have them over to cook outs and dinners to teach them about family life and social skills. We will help out financially. No family will be unduly burdened. That church would help create responsible, capable citizens. Just a few kids, but that church is multiplied by a couple hundred, and suddenly something real is happening!

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How is this thrifty? Everything we can do to help is something our government doesn't have to do. Every life we effect positively is one less burden. A few hundred kids helped is a few hundred criminals and thousands of crimes prevented.

If people are helping, maybe you will be getting some of that help. Maybe a kid kept off the streets will contribute something wonderful to the world. This isn't impossible. It could be real, but it has to start with us, with you and me. I think we can do it.

By Copasetic 1 from North Royalton, OH

Do you have a frugal story to share with the ThriftyFun community? Submit your essay here: http://www.thriftyfun.com/post_myfrugallife.ldml

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41 found this helpful
August 28, 2009 Flag

Being frugal does not mean one should not enjoy life, just that we should examine our way of life to see if what we are doing is bringing us pleasure for the cost associated.

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I recently had the problem of deciding to fill in the artificial nails that was given to me as a gift from my husband or taking them off and saving the money spent for upkeep. I do feel like I'm worth $15 every other week, but in the end I think it just comes down to the fact that I have other interests that I would rather put my money.

In deciding to explore just what I could do with $15 bi weekly I realized that just as artificial nails require upkeep, so do many other items in our lives. It just comes down to is the price to keep the item worth the sacrafice somewhere else.

In my instance, the item cost at the bare minimum $15 bi weekly or 26 times or $390 yearly. $15 biweekly does not sound like much but when one takes it a step further and then investigates what could that $15 really buy that would give equal joy to myself, then that is where the significance is really seen.

For me personally, I decided I would get just as much enjoyment for my $30 this month in the following way: I could buy school supplies for a child I do not know or I could buy a lot of pencils and take to the school for use when a child does not have one. The next month, I could find a nursing home in my area and take $30 worth of socks in all different sizes or I could save my money for a couple of months and take some nightgowns and PJs for the ones that do not have family.

My nails were pretty but I found after examining that I can get much more joy for my money. I'm gonna take the same money and buy some polish, calcium and vitamin D (as someone mentioned) and work on my own nails and use the leftover money in a more frugal and neighborly use.

By notwrong

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22 found this helpful
November 8, 2012 Flag

I have found myself in reduced circumstances pretty chronically for the past 5 years - probably more. I am sure that I share this fate with many people, but, in spite of knowing this, my predicament has seemed like a very private and shameful hell. At least it did, until I became real about it. More people than not live less-than-prosperously, whether because the economy did them in, or because they chose a less fruitful, if more emotionally fulfilling, path to life. I can count myself in this camp, since I decided to pursue art and creativity as a focal point of my attention for many years.

I do not believe that wealth and material abundance are the sine qua non to a good existence, and I don't believe that anyone, deep in their hearts, does either. But everybody pretty much chooses to buy into the b.s., and makes their life goal the acquisition of more, or the upholding of a certain elevated standard of living. By buying into the B.S., we perpetuate a cultural situation where we ignore and underplay all the multifaceted things that bring value to life - a value immeasurable with cash, and not easily exchanged. By underplaying the inherent value of certain things, choices, and opportunities due to their bad conversion in the commodities framework, we castrate our sense of personal destiny, and harbour feelings of shame and inferiority if we fail to rake it in. This in America approaches a cultural disease - which, according to some, translates to physical sickness as well.

Back to my circumstance: I have pursued creativity and personal interest above material acquisition, above having a job. Though I freelance and aggressively pursue financial opportunities (such as writing these essays and things), I spent 80% of my time in pursuits which bring no direct cash conversion, and am reasonably happy. This, summed to my failures in the self-promotional department, have led me to inhabit a place of poverty for many years. By choosing to not buy into the cultural disease, I see my situation as a challenge, and as an inevitable consequence of the life I have lived for many years, and of my actual values.

I have felt values emerge as a direct response to tough circumstances: I am thrifty, non-materialistic, and refuse to take anything at face value. I am ingenious, through choosing to implement solutions through materials and resources I may already have. I don't feel entitled to anything, and am generous when I have something to be generous with. I have learned to really crystallize my own morals, and prioritize my goals, since limited resources force such discipline. And, discipline-wise, I have learned to do without - a lot. Do you know how empowering it is to be just fine when not being able to buy something that to most people - and to yourself at one point - seemed indispensable to existence itself?

Most of all, I have compassion and open-mindedness towards all people and treat all folks equally, and I condemn the shallow hateful attitudes I see - even right here in Madison County NC - that most folk who consider themselves 'open-minded' employ, when confronted with someone 'less than'. This might not mean much to anyone save Jesus Christ, but it means a lot to me.

For anyone who's read this far, I invite you to view your circumstances - no matter how bleak or mediocre they seem - as a gift, and a classroom for important life lessons. And please try to view all of life in all its marvelous entirety, as opposed to through the tired-old one-dimensional prism of 'profit margin' or 'cash value'. You may be surprised as to what you find.

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15 found this helpful
October 9, 2014 Flag

I have always been a pretty frugal person, but I'm finding later in life that I don't need as much as I once thought I did. When you are young, you are led to believe that those pretty new shiny objects you see on TV or someone is wearing is something you just can't live without.

Learning Frugality

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44 found this helpful
May 5, 2010 Flag

My frugal life began when my peaceful existence received a sharp jolt. I'd been living in America with my husband where we had a stillborn child, our beloved daughter Kitty, and our marriage broke up.

My Frugal Life

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10 found this helpful
September 28, 2011 Flag

Manufacturers are so good at persuading us that we HAVE to have their products that it's difficult not to end up buying all sorts of things that we really don't need.

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7 found this helpful
November 13, 2014 Flag

So, alright, I work at Wal-mart and see all kinds of shoppers. Some are good and buy mostly generic. Others use coupons. Then there are people that buy 6 makeup items and spend almost $50! They could have taken five minutes and saved almost $15 in coupons!

A woman looking at a clothing rack.

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14 found this helpful
June 1, 2006 Flag

I've always been pretty smart with money, but three very special little boys have taught me that simplifying all areas of our lives is one of life's sweetest lessons learned.

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12 found this helpful
December 15, 2010 Flag

My tip is to keep looking on ThriftyFun, as you never know who you will find. In January 2008, I posted about my washable nappies. From that post, I met keeper60. Keeper60 lives in USA (we live UK) and has become a valuable member of my family.

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October 13, 2011 Flag

We are frugal not because it is stylish or in style. My husband and I are frugal because he works on a cotton farm and makes very little money, and I am on disability, a fixed income.

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17 found this helpful
March 17, 2009 Flag

The recession has taught me the difference between wants and needs, and how grateful I am to have a warm home, loving family and friends. Some things money just can't buy!

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8 found this helpful
November 9, 2011 Flag

I had always been someone who spent too much on things we just didn't need. I would buy on impulse, and shopped until I dropped. About 6 months ago, I saw a video on YouTube about couponing in Canada, and decided to try it out.

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7 found this helpful
August 6, 2012 Flag

Times are definitely tough for many of us and there is little or no cash for treats and little luxuries. At our house to make belt tightening a bit more fun, we have invented a game; "Good to the Last Drop".

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0 found this helpful
March 21, 2006 Flag

My best frugal tip is to order as many freebies you can get. I visit free sample sites and get make-up, shampoo/conditioner, lotions/perfumes...

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May 23, 2011 Flag

I work just a block away from home. I had been walking to work, but pulled my Achilles Tendon and had to start driving to work.

My Frugal Life Logo

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7 found this helpful
October 4, 2011 Flag

In my small community there are many traditions including having enough food for people that visited around a meal time. It was important to feed them, so this was done by taking out a few more things than was needed for our family.

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7 found this helpful
May 2, 2015 Flag

There seem to be quite a few crafty ladies on this site. Many of you also enjoy thrift shopping. I wanted to share a couple tips that I use to save even more at Goodwill and craft stores.

Coupons for saving at the Goodwill

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13 found this helpful
July 7, 2011 Flag

No one wants to struggle, to say no to themselves and their children, to feel as if they're going backwards rather than forwards. But the easiest way to get out of the slump of despair is to think of everything you do have - and most of us still have a lot.

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10 found this helpful
June 23, 2008 Flag

My friends and I have started a "frugal club." We have made frugal living our new hobby. Whenever we find a sale or a new coupon or new website; we share it with each other. We have made it a friendly competition to find local deals.

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November 13, 2011 Flag

I have been frugal all my life. Thrift shop, giveaways, and garage sales have been as much a part of my life as breathing. In my early years it was out of necessity.

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5 found this helpful
June 12, 2006 Flag

My earliest adult encounter with frugal living was as a twenty-something single woman living on $425 a month in the 70's. I was exasperated with most of the budgeting articles in ladies magazines with titles like "How to Get the Most Out of Your Roast".

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9 found this helpful
August 26, 2011 Flag

How do I make my money stretch? I buy used as much as I can. Garage sales, thrift shops and www.craigslist.org are my go to places for everything. I purchase most non-food items from thrift shops.

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August 9, 2012 Flag

I found my true calling. I know how to save a buck or lest try. As soon as I finish this post, I will be going to get my Sunday papers and look through the coupons, sales and ads.

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7 found this helpful
August 20, 2012 Flag

F: Find alternatives for expensive ingredients or purchases. R: Research online before making your purchases for something you want. Is it a NEED or just a WANT?

Sunflowers

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July 17, 2012 Flag

I love saving money. I love shopping. I love living the good life. Sometimes those worlds collide with each other. I wonder if the occasional going out or buying something with a coupon or on sale, makes me a frugal fraud.

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Kelly Ann Butterbaugh5 found this helpful
April 21, 2009 Flag

Every day people throw out product packaging and then turn around and purchase boxes, bins, and caddies to organize their homes. Instead, reuse the things that you're about to throw away, things that will fill landfills otherwise, and use them to save money and organize your home.

Recycle, Get Organized and Save Money

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3 found this helpful
June 2, 2009 Flag

Being frugal has always been part of my life. My Mom had a chronic illness and had to stay at home. Our family lived on what my father made at a non-union factory job. We definitely used it up, wore it out or did without.

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October 11, 2006 Flag

During a stressful time in our lives, my DH and I did not have the money to pay our rent, so we had to search for a more frugal life for the two of us, our daughter and three children who were at the time living with us, plus our son and his two children who also stayed part-time with us.

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July 24, 2012 Flag

Growing up, I had two cousins who lived across the street from me. They were sisters. One was bigger and the other was smaller than me. The clothes went from my cousin to me, then back to the younger cousin. This went on for years.

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7 found this helpful
February 28, 2013 Flag

I feel very close to the people in the English Colonies. I may be somewhat different in my circumstances but I have the same heart! I appreciate all that I have and try to make it go as long as it can. I use things in different ways, that I think they might have given me the nod of approval.

English Scones

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