Add to GuideAsk a Question
To Top

Dog Pees in House When Left Alone

Even a house trained dog will have accidents under certain circumstances. This is a guide about when a dog pees in house when left alone.
Ad

Questions

Ask a QuestionHere are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

By 0 found this helpful
January 22, 2017

My 7 year old dog is left alone while I am at work. He pees all over the house while I am at work. There is nothing physically wrong with him. How can I stop this?

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
January 23, 20170 found this helpful

crating might be your only solution. Aside from leaving him outside in a yard during the day. By crating him you are both limiting the urine-infected area, and discouraging him to 'do his business' at inappropriate times, because for the most part dogs do not like to void in their beds.

He is older, and I assume you ARE sure that he doesn't actually have any kidney or bladder problems - I know our dog became incontinent a good 7 years before he passed away, and 7 is already 'up there', especially if he is a bigger dog or purebred

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Ad
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
June 28, 2006

My dog is 2. He was crate trained but he pees in the house when I leave him to go to work for 9 hours. How do I stop this he is ruining my carpet?

Erica from Dallas, TX

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
By guest (Guest Post)
June 29, 20060 found this helpful
Best Answer

How about installing a doggie door he can use so he can go out to pee. 9 hrs is to long to expect him not to pee.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
March 4, 2017

I have rehomed two dogs from an animal shelter. One is 7 now and has always been fine, but the other one is 5 and every time I leave her, even for five minutes she pees on the floor and sometimes even poos. It's gotten to the stage that she even does one when I go to the loo myself. So I am only out of the room for seconds. She is only a small Pug so can be carried around if really necessary, but sometimes this isn't practical. Why does she do this? She even sleeps in bed with me lol head on my pillow too. She is very gorgeous and funny, but this is very stressful.

Ad
Answer Was this helpful? Yes
March 9, 20170 found this helpful

Small dogs that you're with nearly all the time often feel stress when you leave, even for a minute. The dog needs to be taught she won't die just because you're not there.

It's best for your dog to have a crate. It should be just big enough for your dog to turn around in. Train your dog to go into the crate for longer amounts of time every day while you are actually there. Then start putting her in the crate when you leave.

Here is a more thorough explanation of the technique: http://www.seni  n-older-dog.html

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
March 27, 2017

I took my puppy from a dog foster home about a year ago. I love him to bits; he has a great personality, and I feel that he loves our family so much. But, whenever I leave him at home he pees in the house on the carpet, on the bed, on flowers, etc.

Ad

My wife and I were thinking about taking him to 'doggy school', but then again, it's extremely expensive, and the nearest 'doggy school' is far away from us. Maybe you have some advice? Thank you.

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
March 27, 20170 found this helpful

It's expensive, but replacing your furniture and rugs will be more expensive. If he has no physical issues, he needs behavior modification. If you're not willing to do that you have to put up gates when you leave the house.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
February 13, 2017

My wife and I just adopted a 8 year old Treeing Walker Coon hound and most of the day she's home while I'm at work, and he never had a problem. But when we both leave to go get groceries or go out to eat or whatever, he will bust down the dog door that keeps him and our other dog in the kitchen and he will always poop in the hallway and pee by the dining room table. We have tried the no marking spay and have shampooed both spots, but he continues to do it. Is there anything else we can do or should we just get him a kennel?

Ad
Answer Was this helpful? Yes
February 13, 20170 found this helpful

Separation anxiety. Meds or the snuggie sweaters and a kennel until it passes.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
November 1, 2015

I have a 10 month old puppy that has separation anxiety. I just rescued her 3 months ago. We have 3 other dogs that are older than her. She has eaten every dog cot we had along with an entire couch and she pees and poops when we are gone and when we go to bed even though she can go out 24/7.

They all go into a very large area in the basement at night and when we leave. I take them all out the regular door regularly when I'm home because she won't go out on her own the way the others do and she will just pee in the house instead of telling me she has to go. I love her, but this needs to stop or my husband is going to divorce me.

Ad
Answer Was this helpful? Yes
November 3, 20150 found this helpful
Best Answer

This seems like just plain anxiety, not really separation anxiety.

Your dog sounds like the omega in the pack. She doesn't want to go out when the others do. When you take her out you empower her, but as the low dog on the totem pole she feels unwelcome otherwise going where the others do.

You already have three dogs. What made you decide to take on another? In the wild, an unrelated puppy would not be allowed to join an already established pack. The puppy would be run off or possibly killed since the dominant female did not give birth to it. The dogs are only tolerating it because you say so, but it certainly feels the stress of not belonging.

Perhaps your puppy would be happier in a home with no other dogs, or a very elderly one.

Trying to provide a home for a rescue is admirable, but it needs to be the right home for the right dog. This doesn't seem like a good match to me.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
May 28, 2015

I have a German Shepherd Rottweiler Chow mix. I've had him since he was a year old. He's had three homes within the last five years. We've finally settled in our new home in January 2015. I had a baby in September of last year. Since we've been in our home he won't go potty outside. I've taken him to the vet and they don't believe when I say he's seven years old and they haven't given me any advice other then shoving pills down his throat which I won't do.


I'm home with him twenty four seven unless I have errands to run. I'm gone for two hours at most. I let him outside every hour. When I'm gone he will pee and poop all over the house even if it's for ten minutes. I love my pup dearly, but I'm about to make a Max soup (I'm kidding but not really haha). If I kennel him I get complaints from the neighbors because he howls and barks until I come back home, but if I don't I come home to piles of grossness. I can't leave him outside because he ruins my garden and I've worked too hard for that. I also have the garden caged in so he can't get to it, but he still destroys it. I haven't built him a cage out back because I know he'll cause a "disturbance" even though everyone that has a dog around us barks constantly. I also just realized how terrible the word cage sounds.

I'm at a loss on what to do. He's had his accidents when his dad and I were both working, but I've been a stay at home mum for a while now. I take him on walks, he's fed very good food, and we have puppy play dates, but he still acts out like a jerk. Any sort of tip will help because I've tried everything I can think of. Thank you for reading!

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
June 2, 20150 found this helpful

I don't criticize what others have written. I will say this - I don't believe I indicated that the dog was "damaged" by this person. I was only saying that moving is an adjustment for dogs.

I also have a German Shepherd - incredibly smart fellow. We got him when he was seven months old. It was a huge adjustment for him. When I related how we handled it with him I was trying to help by telling what worked for us.

Thanks so much for your time and Bless You.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
July 20, 2016

I have a 10 month old black Lab who is relieving himself on the carpet when I'm at work. I work from 3 pm to 12 am. I take him out two times before I go to work, one quick potty break in the morning before breakfast, and then about an hour right before I go to work. I also have an hour long lunch break, and I come home and take him out for another 15 minutes, before I go back to work. When I get home, I take him out again for about 45 min. So he's only alone for four hour intervals without a potty break. Any suggestions on how to make the accidents stop and also how to clean the carpets?

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
February 28, 20170 found this helpful

in order to clean the carpet, enzymatic cleaners are really the only thing that will get rid of that smell. "They work quickly by bio-degrading the stain, grease, oil, dirt, grime, vomit, urine, blood, coffee or food into its basic carbon, hydrogen or oxygen element, eliminating the problem. " Get rid of the smell and the dog is less liable to want to 'go' there.

You can buy one here https://www.che  amp;gclsrc=aw.ds

or, if you have brown sugar, citrus peels and a lot of time on your hands, you can make your own: http://www.wiki  e-Enzyme-Cleaner

As far as the problem, it looks like you need to keep him crated when you're away, and in this way he learns appropriate places to 'go': "Crate training takes advantage of your dog's natural instincts as a den animal. A wild dog's den is their homea place to sleep, hide from danger and raise a family. The crate becomes your dog's den, where they can find comfort and solitude while you know theyre safe and secure (and not shredding your house while you're out running errands). The primary use for a crate is housetraining, because dogs don't like to soil their dens. The crate can limit access to the rest of the house while they learn other rules, like not to chew on furniture. Crates are also a safe way to transport your dog in the car." http://www.huma  /www.google.com/

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

September 11, 20131 found this helpful

I have a Shih Tzu puppy; he's 9 months old. When someone is at home he'll pee on his tray, but when we leave him alone he'll go to pee and poo in the living area. I don't know what to do. If we chain him in the kitchen he'll make another mess cause he'll pee and poo in the area were he's chained. Then he starts stepping on it and it gets all over him and I need to wash him whenever I come back! Please help me cause my mum doesn't want him anymore. We're fighting a lot because of him :(

By Pauline M. from Mellieha, Malta

Answer Was this helpful? 1
November 24, 20140 found this helpful

My dog pees and poops on the floor every time I leave him alone, why?

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
August 31, 2015

I have a 2 year old black Lab that pees when we leave or don't play with him. My dad wants to get rid of him, but my mom, sisters, and I don't. We have no idea what to do. We've sprayed vinger it worked a little bit but not enough. If I could get any advice on this that would be great!

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
August 31, 20150 found this helpful

Dogs are not toys that you throw away when they become torn or dirty. Animals/Pets are living and feeling creatures that can have a problem needing help, just like himans.

Your dog may have a medical problem that results in difficulty in controlling his urine when he is upset. Please take him to your vet to check for any medical problem. Your vet can also help with suggestions on how you can work with your dog to help him with your problem. If you delay, the urine problem will probably worsen as your dog has no way to help himself improve. The first and most important step is to clarify any possible medical issue to help your dog improve.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
June 21, 2015

I have a 3 year old male Boxer. When I'm home he is fine unless someone comes over he doesn't approve of then he tries to attack them. I think he's trying to protect me. I've noticed if I'm not home and my dad's here and someone new comes over he's totally fine as long as I'm not here.

Also he barks to go outside, but if nobody's home he will even if he doesn't have to force himself to pee and it's getting to the point he will pee on my couch, my bed, anywhere. It's gross! The upholstery cleaners my best friends! :( Can anyone offer any advice please? He's really a great dog, he just has those couple things I have to figure out, but look at that face. I love this doggy!

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
June 23, 20151 found this helpful

What a handsome dog. I am a boxer lover too. I provide foster care for boxers that are rescued from shelters until they find their permanent home. The behavior you are describing is because your dog is the pack leader. He is protecting you because he doesn't senses you are in charge. Also the wetting, I believe, is him marking "his territory" There are ways to correct this, and they basically teach the dog "YOU" are the pack leader. It's very important to remove couch, bed etc. privileges for awhile. Then he is only allowed up on furniture if and when you "invite" him. He should be trained to "wait" at the door coming in and out of the house and you go first and he follows. When feeding he should wait and eat only when you tell him. Ideally it should be after you have eaten. These are all things that happen in a dog pack in nature. The alpha tells the other dogs when they can do certain behaviors. There is a web site NILIF "Nothing in Life is Free" that explains in more detail these principles. I and other members of our rescue group have used them with good success with Boxers. Boxers are such smart dogs it doesn't take them long to figure this out. Wishing you good luck.

Reply Was this helpful? 1
Read More Answers

May 15, 20131 found this helpful

I have an 8 month old Puggle and a 3 year old Beagle and every time I leave them alone, I come home to pee and/or poop on the floor. I've tried multiple solutions, but nothing is working. I have to work for 12 hours, but I live close to work so I come home on my break to let them outside.

My first attempt was leaving my Puggle crated and my Beagle in another area of the house. But when I would come home, the Puggle would have peed outside the crate and for some reason never had a problem pooping inside his cage would make an even bigger mess in the crate. So I tried leaving him in a separate room and he clawed a huge hole in the wall. So then I put him in the kitchen and put a gate up to keep the dogs separated. He learned to climb and climbed over the gate and still makes a mess in the house. When I come home on my break during work, he doesn't pee outside because he's already peed inside and then ends up peeing again inside once I go back to work again.

I don't know what other options I have to teach him not to do this. He never pees or poops inside when I am home, but I could leave for an hour, and there will be some kind of mess when I get back.

By Lauren

Answer Was this helpful? 1
May 18, 20130 found this helpful

Sounds like separation anxiety. Have you tried leaving the TV or a radio on at a 'murmur volume'?

Another help might be to put the two crates side-by-side in the same room when you go out. Plastic sheeting under the crates will catch any mess and make clean-up easier too.

Do you ever crate the dogs when you are home? That's a helpful training exercise actually and especially helpful with dogs suffering separation anxiety.

If the only time your dogs are in the crate is when you leave they will come to associate the crate with separation. Some dogs don't mind but others mind terribly. Even putting a 'comfie' (for example a robe you've worn enough to really make it smell like you) into the crate won't help if the dog knows the only time he's crated is when you are leaving.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

By 0 found this helpful
January 31, 2016

Our two year old dog that hasn't had an accident in the house since he was 6 months old has suddenly decided to start peeing in the house (on our couches) when we are gone. He has a doggy door and access to the backyard at all times. We've tried cleaning it with the pet odor removing cleaners, etc., but he keeps peeing. We are hesitant to punish him too much as we can't catch him in the act since we aren't home when he does it and he never does it while we're home. Any help on how to correct this would be great. We work away from home and we live in a freezing area, so crating him all day won't work and putting him outside all day won't work.

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
January 31, 20160 found this helpful

It seems your dog doesn't want to go out in the cold to do his business. He doesn't misbehave when you're there because he knows you'd catch him doing it.

Did you train him on pee pads or newspaper? Can you switch him back to those until the weather warms up a bit?

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

April 7, 20140 found this helpful

My 5 year old Chihuahua keeps peeing or pooping in the house when he is left alone. What do I do? What can I do to correct the problem? Are there any classes that could fix it?

By Tiffany from Lebanon, OH

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
April 10, 20140 found this helpful

Look at the posts on this issue on this site. It is a common problem.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

March 8, 20140 found this helpful

I have this 9 month old pup that I rescued about 3 or 4 weeks ago. He is super cute and sweet, but has major separation anxiety. He will tear anything and everything up that he can get to the second we leave the house. If I go into another room that he isn't allowed in, so he is left "alone", he will pee and poop in our formal dinning room. He pees on the legs of the furniture and poops in the corners. I have tried the positive training with treats when he goes outside, but that spoiled him. And I've gotten so frustrated that I punish him almost every time now. I feel like I'm out of options, my mom said if he doesn't stop we are giving him back or making him an outside 24/7 dog.

By Jennifer B.

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
March 10, 20140 found this helpful

Punishment doesn't work unless you punish in the 10 seconds after the infraction has taken place. You just destroy the trust your dog has for you. Look a little further for different training methods. Good luck to you.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

By 0 found this helpful
October 8, 2015

My male Yorkie, Romo, is very stubborn. I'm gone from 7:30AM-5 PM every weekday. I take him outside twice every morning and feed him in the evenings. He poops every morning, but still everyday when I get home there is a poop pile and a pee spot. Also every weekend when I'm home he's fine. He never goes in the house when I'm home. I tried crating him in a crate small enough for him to just turn around in and he still went in his crate. I really don't want to drive home everyday from work on my lunch to let him outside. Are there any other options? Help please.

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
October 11, 20150 found this helpful

Your dog is not stubborn. You are asking your dog to hold his pee and poop for 9 and a half hours. Could you do this? Try leaving for work and not going to the bathroom until you get home.

Second of all, your dog is home all day. Dogs can not read or surf the internet or use the phone. Your dog is home alone, bored with no stimulation for the entire day.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

By 0 found this helpful
September 26, 2015

I have a 6 month old Beagle mix, Walker Blue Tick/Beagle. Anyways, Fred will go all night with out going potty in the house, but if we leave the house for a half hour we come home to him having peed and pooped in the livingroom or kitchen. We don"t cage him up because he will freak out and chew on the metal cage to get out. Any help would be greatly appreciated since I also have a 18 month old son. I'm scared I will have to get rid of Fred.

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
September 26, 20150 found this helpful

I'd like some more information here.

First, how often do you walk Fred? The walk is a bonding experience that also increases your dog's confidence and helps drain his puppy energy. A Blue Tick Beagle mix needs to walk a LOT. With a toddler, this may be difficult. An hour a day broken up into two thirty minute walks would not be too much. If you are only doing twice a week or so it is way too little.

Freaking out and chewing the cage shows a neurotic and nervous behavior. Beagles especially can be high-strung bundles of energy and need a calm and structured environment.

Is your home calm or chaotic? Is it structured or more "anything goes?"

Finally, this dog will need training. He will need to learn several things: To walk on a leash properly, not to eat everything that smells good (especially with Beagles), not to jump up on your son, try to take food/toys from his hand, etc.

You're going to need time and focus for the dog's training. Be honest if you really have that right now. You're going to have to focus on your son learning to use the potty or eat with regular utensils and all the other stuff he needs to know. Children are a lot of work. If you honestly feel you don't have the time and energy to also train and socialize a dog, luckily he is young enough to find a home with someone who has the time and training experience. Experience with Beagles and hounds is a plus.

As for the peeing, it should go away with peace and quiet, more intense walking, more discipline and structure for the dog.

The cage should be used as a den or bed for naps and rest time, but don't close the door at these times. Eventually you should be able to close the door and leave if your dog is tired enough from daily exercise to need to catch up with a quick nap while you're gone.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

March 2, 20150 found this helpful

Our French Bulldog is 6 years old and every time we leave him alone he pees in the house. It could be 10 minutes or 4 hours. We have tried kennel training and he broke two of the wires trying to get out and hurt himself. We've tried putting him in our room and he destroyed the door frame. We tried the bathroom and he ripped up all the tile. When we leave, we leave the TV on and some lights. We have a baby coming in 3 months so would really like to not have to worry about her laying or crawling in dog pee!

By Ariel D.

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
March 2, 20150 found this helpful

This is extreme separation anxiety. Here are some links:

http://www.aspc  paration-anxiety

http://pets.web  ion-anxiety-dogs

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

February 24, 20150 found this helpful

I recently moved with my dog. He used to have access to outdoors and indoors all day though a doggy door. The new house does not have this. However, he is only ever home 4.5 hours without a potty break. Either I go home at lunch or a dog walker comes and takes him to the dog park. He was doing fine. However, recently I started a fitness class after work which brings me home an hour later. We adjusted his potty break so the dog walker comes at noon (I leave at 8:00 a.m.) and leaves him at 1:15 p.m. and I arrive home at 5:30. He has been peeing on these days I have this class only. He is home alone the same amount of time the other days, but does not pee when I am home at the usual time, even though the times he is alone are the same. I wonder if he is doing this just because I am not home when "I am supposed to be"? How can I break this habit?

By Jenna

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
February 25, 20150 found this helpful

Your poor dog! He had alot of freedom in his old home and is now very restricted in his new home. It is clear he is not a happy camper. Is it possible to make a new doggie door to give him full access in and out? If not, your vet may be able to help you help your dog adjust to his new requirements. There are also pet training services that may be able to help.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

January 27, 20150 found this helpful

I have a mutt that is 5 years old. We rescued him from the pound when he was one. When we leave, he poops and sometimes pees in the house. Even if we take him out right before we leave, then forgot something and 1 minute later go back inside he is in the act of pooping, like he is doing it on purpose. He is a great dog! Only when we are gone does he act up. We tired the crate and he not only chewed through one cage but three cages. One was metal and the other two were a thick plastic. What do I need to do?

By Krystal

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
July 7, 20150 found this helpful

He empties because he's stressed. You lock him in a very large cage, the house, and he can't escape the imagined enemies. He needs a companion to help him feel safe.

Reply Was this helpful? Yes

April 12, 20130 found this helpful

We have a 4 year old female Pit Bull we adopted when she was a year old. We also have another smaller dog that is also 4 years old. They are both house trained and know not to pee in the house, but the Pit Bull will potty in our house in random areas (hallway, kitchen, etc.) when we sleep if we don't let her sleep in the room with us. They always slept with us, but I am now 6 months pregnant and it is just too uncomfortable for them to be in the bed with us so we let them stay in the living room. I'm not sure if she is just rebelling because she is upset she can't stay in the bed with us anymore.

By Angellle

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
April 12, 20130 found this helpful

I would guess she is just ticked. Maybe take her to see your vet to rule out bladder issues or infection. You could also try putting dog beds in your room, and teaching them to go to their beds, and not sleep in yours. Best of luck!

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers

February 7, 20130 found this helpful

I have a 5 year old male Pit Bull, and I have to put him in a cage every time I leave. When I go to bed he has to be in his cage or in the room I'm in with the door shut. If he is away from me too long he will go to the bathroom in the house. I feel like he is nervous if he can't see me or knows I'm gone. How can I stop this? I don't like leaving him in a cage. I want him to be free to walk the house.

By Giovanna

Answer Was this helpful? Yes
February 9, 20130 found this helpful

At his age there probably isn't much you can do to cure his separation anxiety and the best place for him when you are out is the crate.

I used to leave the TV on low in another room for my young Boxers but in all the years I raised AKC Boxers in the US (40+) there were times no matter what I did for an anxious puppy; he/she grew up to be an anxious adult. So I learned to live with it-dogs have individual personalities and some are just anxious by nature so we worked around it:)

By the way, with an anxious older dog, draping a duvet or blanket over the back half of the crate seemed to be an extra soothing thing to do for the dog. Although dogs evolved from lupine to canine a very long time ago, certain things like den behaviours have remained-dogs, like wolves, are thrilled (and soothed) by a den like place to call their own.

Good luck with your lad, he sounds like a lovely fellow who absolutely adores you:)

Reply Was this helpful? Yes
Read More Answers
Load More
Related Content
In This Guide
Sad puppy laying next to wet spot on the floor with human finger pointing at it.
Dog Peeing in the House
Categories
Pets Dogs House TrainingFebruary 14, 2013
Guides
Previously house trained dog.
Previously House Trained Dog Peeing Indoors
Dog Pees in the House When Excited
Dog Pees in the House When Excited
Previously House Broken Dog Has Started Pooping in the House
House Trained Dog Pooping Inside
dog sitting in bed
Dog Pees in Owner's Bed
More
😎
Summer Ideas!
🎆
Fourth of July Ideas!
👔
Father's Day Ideas!
Facebook
Pinterest
YouTube
Contests!
Newsletters
Ask a Question
Share a Post
Categories
Desktop Page | View Mobile

Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Contact Us

© 1997-2017 by Cumuli, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Published by .

Generated 2017/06/20 21:26:17 in 3 secs.
Loading Something Awesome!