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Decoupage Craft Ideas

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Decoupage Box

Decoupage is a craft that is not only easy for the beginner, but has numerous applications for all ranges of experience. This is a guide containing decoupage craft ideas.

Solutions: Decoupage Craft Ideas

Read and rate the best solutions below by giving them a "thumbs up".

Vintage Decoupage Tin

The completed tin.My father is currently recovering from cancer, and he uses a food supplement called Lifegain that comes in a neat tin. When the first tin was empty, I asked my mom if I could have it, as I was thinking of recycling this tin.

I recently discovered some old family photos in my mother's cupboard. The photos are more than 50 years old, and all of them are coming from the era when black and white photos were still regarded as fashionable. I decided to use one of these photos to decoupage the empty Lifegain tin, and to make something new from something that otherwise, would have ended up on the rubbish bin.

Approximate Time: 3 hours

Supplies:

  • a suitable old black and white photo
  • a photo editing program ~ I used PhotoScape version 3.5, which can be downloaded free of charge from http://www.photoscape.org/.
  • an old tin
  • paint stripper and paint scraper
  • a can of quick-drying white spray paint
  • an 8/32 inch paint brush
  • fine paintbrush
  • a fan-shaped paint brush
  • water-based primer
  • Deco Art glue
  • Modge Podge
  • water-based varnish
  • hairdryer
  • acrylic paint in the following three colors: white, flesh, and old gold
  • a stencil that will fit with the rest of the design ~ cut your own design from an old X-ray film
  • a rose made from polymer clay (available from craft shops)
  • silicone gel
  • a pair of standard scissors
  • a few sheets of old newspapers to protect the working area
  • an old cloth

Instructions:

  1. Apply a coat of paint stripper to the tin and the tin's lid. Depending on the type of stripper used (follow instructions of the manufacturer), wait approximately 1 minute, and then use the scraper to peel off the paint. If necessary, use a second coat of paint stripper to get rid of all the paint.
  2. Wash the tin and lid in warm soapy water and dry it thoroughly.
  3. Use the can of quick-drying spray paint to give the tin and lid a base color. Remember not to hold the can too close to the tin or lid when spraying, and do not spray too much paint, as this will cause the paint to run.
  4. Let the tin and lid dry thoroughly. If necessary, apply a second coat of paint.
  5. Scan the photo onto your computer.

  6. With the PhotoScape program, choose the Filter button and click on Region (Out of Focus). Choose the black radial option, with the settings 85% for the Size and 40% for the Feather.
  7. From the different frames that can be added to the photo, choose the Antique 04 frame and set the width at 150%.
  8. Save the adjusted photo onto your computer. If you want to keep the scan of the original photo for another project, remember to save the adjusted photo under a different name.
  9. Print the number of copies that would be needed for the tin ~ I used 6 for this tin.
  10.  The edited vintage photo that was used for the project.

  11. With a slightly wet 8/32 inch brush, paint a thin layer of the water-based primer over the whole tin and lid. Remember not to paint on the area that will be under the lid once closed, as this will cause the lid to eventually get stuck to the tin.
  12. Dry the tin and lid thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  13. Next, using the same paint brush, add a thin layer of white acrylic paint to the whole tin and lid, again making sure not to paint on the area under the lid once closed.
  14. Dry the tin and lid thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  15. Using the fan-shaped paint brush, give the tin and lid a wash with the flesh-colored acrylic paint, again not painting on the area under the lid. Make sure to especially add some detail to the bottom of the tin and the edge of the lid with the flesh-colored acrylic paint. Remember not to use too much paint when using a fan-shaped brush, as this will lose the fan-shaped effect ~ remove excess paint by dabbing it onto a sheet of newspaper before starting to paint.
  16. Dry the tin and lid thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  17. Repeat step 14, but this time using the old gold acrylic paint.
  18. Again, dry the tin and lid thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  19. Cut out the pictures and decide how they will be placed on the tin. Having the pictures slightly overlap one another and placing them on different levels, creates a more interesting end result.
  20. With the 8/32 inch brush, paint a substantial amount of Deco Art Glue to the back of the first picture. Turn the picture around and put it in position on the tin, but do not press it down.
  21. With the brush, spread glue to the front of the picture, lightly applying pressure so that it will stick to the tin.
  22. Working from the middle of the picture, and from inside towards the outside, rub out all the air bubbles and excess glue from the back of the picture. Use an old cloth to clear any excess glue from the tin.
  23. Use the hairdryer to dry the picture thoroughly.
  24. Repeat steps 19-22 with the other pictures.
  25. Use a stencil and a thin paint brush to add some detail with the old gold paint.
  26. The detail that was added with the stencil.

  27. Use the hairdryer to dry the stenciled designs.
  28. With the 8/32 inch brush, paint a thin layer of Modge Podge over the whole tin. Remember again not to paint on the area under the lid. The Modge Podge will protect the pictures and give the product a smoother finish.
  29. Dry the tin thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  30. Repeat steps 26-27 ~ you need to apply at least 6 coats of Modge Podge, but remember that with every layer, the direction in which the Modge Podge is applied, must be changed from horizontal to vertical to horizontal, etc. Also, remember that after every layer of Modge Podge, the tin must first be dried thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  31. With the 8/32 inch brush, add a layer of water-based varnish to the whole tin and lid, and again use the hairdryer to dry the tin and lid thoroughly.
  32. Using a fine paintbrush, paint the polymer clay rose with the flesh-colored acrylic paint. Allow to dry, and then add some detail to the rose with the old gold acrylic paint.
  33. A close-up of the rose.

  34. Glue the rose to the top of the lid with the silicone gel and allow it to dry thoroughly.

Tips:

  • I deliberately didn't use Paper Seal, as the running of the ink added to the vintage look. If preferred, one can paint a thin layer of Paper Seal over the printouts of the photos before gluing them onto the tin.
  • To clean, wipe with a damp cloth and do not use strong detergents. Not dishwasher safe.
  • When doing decoupage, do not use the highest heat setting on the hairdryer.

Photos included:
Photo 1: The edited vintage photo that was used for the project.
Photo 2: The detail that was added with the stencil.
Photo 3: A close-up of the rose.
Photo 4: The completed tin.

By BessieBessie from Pretoria, Gauteng

Craft Project: Decoupage Wall Plaques

Craft Project: Decoupage Wall Plaque SuppliesSmall wooden plaques with picture cut from magazines or other sources which are decoupaged into place using half white glue and half water or a decoupage medium, filled in or enhanced with paint.

Approximate Time: 2-3 days counting drying times

Supplies:

  • colorful pictures
  • acrylic paints
  • good sharp scissors
  • brush for glue
  • hanging device for hanging finished plaque
  • screw or nail for wall
  • twigs or small dried leaves
  • white glue like Elmer's or decoupage medium
  • palette knife or craft stick
  • paint brush for paints
  • water container
  • wire if needed
  • bits of string, tiny silk flowers
  • seashells and tiny stones

Instructions:

  1. Start by finding the picture you'd like to see hanging on your wall, then carefully cut it out.

  2. Have someone cut a nice thin piece of wood like 3/8 inch plywood, for instance wide enough and long enough so that you have room all around the picture to do a bit of your own artwork.

  3. Lay your picture on the wood where you want it to be when the plaque is finished. Make small marks at many places around your picture, then lay it aside.

  4. Using your acrylic paints, paint the board with a good basic coat of neutral color to seal it and make it easier to paint your artwork on it.

  5. When the basecoat is very dry after several hours maybe, go back and start painting things that will enhance the picture you intend to use as the focal point on your plaque.

  6. You can make some of the paint very thick using the palette knife or craft stick making sure to use the colors that you want to be a permanent part of your finished picture plaque.

  7. When it's all dry, add a good coat of watered down white glue to the back side of your picture. Carefully put it into place on your plaque and gently smooth out all the bubbles and edges. Add a coat of the watered down glue to the top of your picture as well to seal it very well. Allow to dry for an entire day. Close up of Decoupaged Wall Plaque

  8. You might want to add a bit more paint to brighten up some areas or highlight other areas. Be sure you have a sky painted in if it's a landscape type picture.

  9. Carefully place the hanging device to the back of your plaque. It might be light enough that just simple duct tape will hold a bit of ribbon in place, then put the ribbon over a small nail or screw in the wall. You may also use hot glue to a small hanger in place. Decoupaged Wall Plaque Hanger

    See the finished plaques I made for my daughters' room. They all loved dolls, so I made doll plaques. Whatever type of clothing the dolls had on, I tried to match the background and anything else I added to the pictures. Pair of Decoupaged Wall Plaques

    Any questions, just ask, and I'll do my best to help you. Do get the children involved in this project, and let them do as much of the actual work as possible. There is nothing like crafts and creativity to open up their minds and imagination. Have fun.

    By Pookarina from Boca Raton, FL

Craft Project: Tin Decoupaged with Old Family Photos

I recently discovered some old family photos in my mother's cupboard. The photos are more than 50 years old, and all of them are coming from the era when black and white photos were still regarded as fashionable. I decided to use some of these photos to decoupage an empty chocolate tin, and in the process, make something new from something that otherwise, would have ended up in the rubbish bin.

Approximate Time: 2 hours

Supplies:

  • suitable old black and white photos
    I used 7 different photos for this tin.
  • a photo editing program
    I used PhotoScape version 3.5, which can be downloaded free of charge from http://www.photoscape.org/
  • an old tin
    I used an empty delicious chocolate tin.
  • paint stripper
  • paint scraper
  • an 8/32" paint brush
  • fine paintbrush
  • a fan-shaped paint brush
  • white water-based primer
  • paper seal
  • deco art glue
  • Modge Podge
  • water-based varnish
  • hairdryer
  • acrylic paint in the following two colours: soft pink and old gold
  • a few sheets of white printer paper
  • a pair of standard scissors
  • a few sheets of old newspapers to protect the working area
  • an old cloth

Instructions:

  1. Apply a coat of paint stripper to the tin and the tin's lid. Depending on the type of stripper used (follow instructions of the manufacturer), wait approximately 1 minute, and then use the scraper to peel off the paint. If necessary, use a second coat of paint stripper to get rid of all the paint.

  2. Wash the tin and lid in warm soapy water and dry it thoroughly.

  3. Scan the photos onto your computer.

  4. If the original colours of the photos differ, the colours of the photos must be made uniform. With the PhotoScape program, first turn each photo to greyscale, and then to sepia.

  5. Choose the filter button and click on region (out of focus). Choose the black radial option, with the settings 85% for the Size and 35% for the Feather.

  6. From the different frames that can be added to the photo, choose the Wedding 01 frame and set the width at 100%.

  7. Save the adjusted photos onto your computer. If you want to keep the scans of the original photos for another project, remember to save the adjusted photos under a different name. If necessary, resize the photos so that they will fit onto the chosen tin.

  8. Print the number of copies that will be needed for the tin ~ I used 2 copies of each photo for this tin.

  9. With a slightly wet 8/32" brush, paint a thin layer of the water-based primer over the whole tin and lid. Remember not to paint on the area that will be under the lid once closed, as this will cause the lid to eventually get stuck to the tin.

  10. Dry the tin and lid thoroughly with a hairdryer.

  11. Next, using the fan-shaped paint brush, give the tin and lid a wash with the soft pink acrylic paint, again making sure not to paint on the area under the lid. Remember not to use too much paint when using a fan-shaped brush, as this will lose the fan-shaped effect ~ remove excess paint by dabbing the brush onto a sheet of newspaper before starting to paint.

  12. Dry the tin and lid thoroughly with a hairdryer.

  13. Repeat step 11, but this time using the old gold acrylic paint.

  14. Again, dry the tin and lid thoroughly with a hairdryer. Pinted Tin

  15. With the 8/32" brush, paint a thin layer of Paper Seal over the printouts of the photos. The Paper Seal will protect the ink from running and will make it easier to cut out the printouts of the photos without tearing it.

  16. Cut out the printouts of the photos and decide how they will be arranged on the tin. Having the pictures slightly overlap one another and placing them on different levels, creates a more interesting end result.

  17. For the lid, draw a circle the size of the lid on the sheet of printer paper. Use the second set of photo printouts to make a collage for the lid. Collage of Photos on tin lid

  18. With the 8/32" brush, paint a substantial amount of Deco Art Glue to the back of the first photo printout. Turn the printout around and put it in position on the tin, but do not press it down. Paint brush and paper

  19. With the brush, spread glue to the front of the printout, lightly applying pressure so that it will stick to the tin.

  20. Working from the middle of the printout, and from inside towards the outside, rub out all the air bubbles and excess glue from the back of the printout. Use an old cloth to clear any excess glue from the tin.

  21. Use the hairdryer to dry the printout thoroughly, be careful not to use the highest heat setting on the hairdryer. Glued photo on tin

  22. Repeat steps 18-21 with the other printouts.

  23. Cut out the collage for the lid, and following steps 18-21, glue the collage of the printouts to the lid.

  24. Use a thin paint brush to add some detail to the tin with the old gold paint, and dry these with the hairdryer.

  25. With the 8/32" brush, paint a thin layer of Modge Podge over the whole tin. Remember again not to paint on the area under the lid. The Modge Podge will protect the pictures and give the product a smoother finish.

  26. Dry the tin thoroughly with a hairdryer.

  27. Repeat steps 25-26 ~ you need to apply at least 8 coats of Modge Podge, but remember that with every layer, the direction in which the Modge Podge is applied, must be changed from horizontal to vertical to horizontal, etc. Also, remember that after every layer of Modge Podge, the tin must first be dried thoroughly with the hairdryer.

  28. Now repeat steps 25-26 with the lid ~ again, you need to apply at least 8 coats of Modge Podge. Remember to change the direction in which the Modge Podge is applied and remember to dry every layer of Modge Podge thoroughly with the hairdryer.

  29. With the 8/32" brush, add a layer of water-based varnish to the whole tin and lid, and again use the hairdryer to dry the tin and lid thoroughly.

By BessieBessie from Pretoria, Gauteng Decoupaged Tin with old photos

Découpaged Easter Eggs

Decoupage Easter EggIf you're looking for a quick and easy craft to do this Easter, then decoupage is definitely for you. Decoupage comes from the old French word decouper, meaning "to cut out", so if you can cut and paste, you already know most of the techniques involved.

Basically, all you have to do is cut out pictures, glue the pictures onto an object, and then cover the object with glue to seal it. Not only is the end result very effective, decoupage won't make a hole in your budget; and you'll be able to create a beautiful display for your home, as well. Happy Easter!

Approximate Time: 30 minutes (per egg) plus drying time

Supplies:

  • polystyrene eggs from a budget store or craft supplier
  • paper napkins/serviettes
  • gesso or white acrylic paint
  • a decoupage medium; diluted white glue or school glue (PVA) - 3 parts glue to 1 part water
  • sponge
  • cotton bud
  • damp paper towel or rag
  • paint brush
  • pair of scissors

Instructions:

  1. Paint lots of polystyrene eggs with gesso (acrylic primer) or white, acrylic paint.

    Note: decoupage works best on matte surfaces, so apply at least one base coat of paint to remove the shiny finish on your eggs.

  2. Peel off all white layers from the back of a paper serviette/napkin. Only the top printed layer is used. Cut out a motif with a small pair of scissors. Alternatively, tear out an image.

  3. Apply a thin layer of diluted PVA to the surface of your egg. Position the motif on the surface and carefully smooth it out using a cotton bud or a sponge; start in the centre and work outwards to work out any air bubbles or wrinkles. Let the motif set for a few moments and then clean up the edges with a damp paper towel or rag. Repeat until all your images are glued on the eggs. Leave to dry completely.

  4. To finish, apply a minimum of two coats of diluted PVA using a brush to seal each egg.

    Note: leave to dry thoroughly between each coat. The edges of the serviette motifs should end up smooth.

  5. Display your eggs in dishes or baskets around the home, alternatively, string together to make an Easter mobile.

You can have a go at decoupaging other household objects too, such as a lampshade, plant pot, wooden box, or even a glass plate.

By Anne D. from United Kingdom

Tip: Mod Podge Substitute

I recently discovered that with a little water added to plain white craft glue, the same crafts can be made, with the same results instead of using the more expensive Mod Podge as an adhesive/sealant/gloss.

By

Craft Project: Decoupage Cross

If you like to decoupage, you will like making this cross. I started with a plain wood cross purchased at Michael's.

Approximate Time: 2 to 3 hours

Supplies:

  • wood cross
  • regular decoupage
  • medium paintbrush
  • old plastic tablecloth
  • tissue paper or thin paper of your choice
  • craft foam, felt, or fleece for backing

Instructions:

I started by laying out the tablecloth and then wiping the cross with a slightly damp paper towel just to remove any dust. The paper you use can be cut into pieces or just ripped, it's your choice. I like to start in the middle somewhere and glue the first piece on by either painting the decoupage on to the paper or on the surface you are working on.

Tissue paper will curl when you paint it, so when you first start, it might be easier to paint a small section and then lay the paper on it and press with the paintbrush. At this point, you can go over the piece with another layer of decoupage or wait until you have several pieces on. You can't really make a mistake here, so just have fun with it!

When I have the cross covered to my satisfaction, I paint on 2 more coats, letting each layer dry an hour or so between coats. I have embellished further with beads, but you may choose not to. I used a piece of craft foam for the back of this one just to give it a more finished look by tracing the cross on the foam and cutting it out using pinking sheers and then glued it to the back.

I have covered many items with this method (bottles, plastic containers), really anything that you think needs a refreshed look! Good luck!

By Robbie from IN

Decoupage a Flower Vase for Spring

Spring is usually seen as a time of growth and renewal, a time to fall in love and to breathe new life into romance. Nat King Cole managed to encapsulate the joy of spring in his song "Spring is Here."

It is also a time for nature's dullness to be replaced by the splendor of colors, a season to be enjoyed by avid gardeners. A popular flower that can be sown after the bothersome frost has taken leave, is cosmos. Cosmos originated in Mexico and South America, and were grown in mission gardens in Mexico. The missionaries christened the flower, cosmos, due to its evenly placed petals. The word cosmos comes from the Greek word for harmony or ordered universe.

In this article, you will be shown how to create a decorative flower vase, using decoupage techniques, and combining the lyrics of "Spring is Here" and cutouts of cosmos flowers. A perfect way to bring the joy of spring into your home!

Approximate Time: 2 hours

Supplies:

  • the lyrics of the song "Spring is Here"
    see http://lyrics-keeper.com/en/nat-king-cole/spring-is-here.html
  • a cylinder shaped plastic flower vase.
    (For one like the one used for this article: http://www.burtonandburton.com/store/productDetailForm.asp?CollID=83437. But any plastic flower vase can be used.)
  • 10/32" paint brush
  • fan-shaped paint brush
  • white water-based primer
  • Paper Seal
  • Deco Art Glue
  • Modge Podge
  • water-based varnish
  • acrylic paint in the following three colors: Sweet Memories (pink), flesh, and Old Gold
  • hairdryer
  • pictures of white and pink cosmos
  • pair of standard scissors
  • a few sheets of old newspapers to protect the working area
  • an old cloth

Instructions:

  1. Wash the vase in warm soapy water and dry it thoroughly with an old cloth.
  2. Copy the lyrics of "Spring is Here" onto your computer. Change the font into ornamental lettering and the font color into pink, before printing the lyrics.
  3. With a slightly wet 10/32" brush, paint a thin layer of the white water-based primer over the outside of the vase. Do not paint the bottom of the vase, and paint the sides of the vase up to where the top rim starts to protrude. Dry it thoroughly with the hairdryer, be careful not to use the highest heat setting on the hairdryer, as the vase might become too hot to handle.
  4. Paint the layer of water-based primer on outside of pot.

  5. Next, using the same paint brush, add a thin layer of Sweet Memories-colored acrylic paint over the water-based primer. Dry it thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  6. Wash outside with the flesh-colored acrylic paint.

  7. Next, using a fan-shaped brush, give the outside of the vase a wash with the flesh-colored acrylic paint. Remember not to use too much paint when using a fan-shaped brush, as this will lose the fan-shaped effect. Remove excess paint by dabbing it onto a sheet of newspaper before starting to paint. Again, dry it thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  8. If necessary, resize the pictures of the cosmos and print them; I used 10 cosmos for the vase.
  9. The photo used for this craft.

  10. With the 10/32" brush, paint a thin layer of Paper Seal over the sheet with the lyrics, and over the printouts of the cosmos. The Paper Seal will protect the ink from running and will make it easier to cut out the pictures without tearing them.
  11. Paint Paper Seal over the printout of the lyrics

  12. Dry the sheet with the lyrics and the printouts with cosmos thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  13. Cut out the lyrics and the cosmos, and decide how they will be placed on the vase.
  14. With the 10/32" brush, paint a substantial amount of Deco Art Glue to the back of the piece of paper with the lyrics. Turn the piece of paper around and put it in position on the vase, but do not press it down.
  15. With the brush, spread glue to the front of the piece of paper, lightly applying pressure so that it will stick to the vase.
  16. Working from the middle of the piece of paper, and from inside towards the outside, rub out all the air bubbles and excess glue from the back of the paper. Use an old cloth to gently clear any excess glue from the vase.
  17. Rub out all the air bubbles from the back of the cosmos.

  18. Use the hairdryer to dry the piece of paper with the lyrics thoroughly.
  19. Repeat steps 10-13 with the cosmos. The cosmos should "bloom" all around the vase.
  20. Using the fan-shaped paint brush, give the vase a wash with the old gold acrylic paint. Again, dry it thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  21. With the 10/32" brush, paint a thin layer of Modge Podge over the painted part of the vase. The Modge Podge will protect the pictures and give the product a smoother finish.
  22. Dry the vase thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  23. Repeat steps 16-17. You need to apply at least 6 coats of Modge Podge, but remember that with every layer, the direction in which the Modge Podge is applied, must be changed from horizontal to vertical to horizontal, etc. Also, remember that after every layer of Modge Podge, the vase must first be dried thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  24. With the 10/32" brush, add a layer of water-based varnish to the painted part of the vase. This time, also paint the bottom of the vase with the varnish for a neater finish. Again, dry it thoroughly with the hairdryer.
  25. The completed vase from different angles.

  26. Add some fresh flowers, or some artificial ones, to the vase and you are ready to celebrate spring!

Tips:

  1. To wash, rinse briefly in cold water and do not use strong detergents. Not dishwasher safe.
  2. When doing decoupage, do not use the highest heat setting on the hairdryer.
Add some artificial flowers to the vase.

By BessieBessie from Pretoria, Gauteng

Tip: Ideas for Decoupage

I've decoupaged a lot of things over the years: blank premade cardboard boxes of different shapes (from Michael's Crafts), stools, shelves, trays, plastic eggs, a clear glass plate, and trivet. They both have flowers on them and the pictures went underneath the plate and trivet. I am also planning to decoupage a suitcase or two with stamps.

I'm currently working on a wooden plant box. I painted it first; and I am just getting ready to put some nice pictures of flowers on each side. Then I'll put polyurethane on it, as it will be going outside for spring and summer. I have started several plants already indoors. Once they are big enough to transplant into the ground or into a larger pot, I'll take the pots of plants and put them in the decoupaged planter box and put it outside. It's a lot of fun.

I once saw an article where someone decoupaged a door knob. I was thinking of doing some light switch plates. The possibilities are endless!

By Karen H. from Pawtucket, RI

Decoupage a Memo Holder

My teaching colleague and friend will celebrate her birthday soon. At our school, she is a Grade Tutor, and she is responsible for addressing behavioral and social problems with the learners in her grade. She often has to phone parents, or send learners to see the support staff members, like the social worker or the life coach. The learners are not allowed to walk around without permission from a teacher, so she is always in need of memo notes. This memo holder will make a suitable gift. Memo Holder Step 6

Approximate Time: 2 hours

Supplies:

  • a photo editing program
    I used PhotoScape version 3.5, which can be downloaded free of charge from http://www.photoscape.org/.
  • wooden memo holder, available from a craft shop
  • 10/32 inch paint brush
  • fan-shaped paint brush
  • white water-based primer
  • Deco Art Glue
  • Modge Podge
  • water-based varnish
  • hairdryer
  • acrylic paint in the following two colors: flesh and old gold
  • Victorian clipart
    I downloaded clipart from http://antiqueclipart.com ~ the clipart on this site is part of the public domain and is not copyrighted.
  • a piece of brown paper
    I used the type that one normally uses to cover school books.
  • 2 wooden scrapbook photo corners
    see - http://www.designerdigitals.com/digital-scrapbooking/supplies/product_info.php/products_id/12529 for a possible supplier
  • strong bonding glue
  • pair of standard scissors
  • few sheets of old newspapers to protect the working area
  • fine sanding paper
  • an old cloth

Instructions:

  1. Sandpaper the whole memo holder thoroughly inside and out. Dust well with a dry cloth before starting to paint. Memo Holder step 1

  2. With a slightly wet 10/32 inch brush, paint a thin layer of the white water-based primer over the whole memo box, inside and out, and dry it thoroughly with a hairdryer. Make sure that all the corners and edges are well covered with the primer. Please note: Do not paint the back of the memo holder at all.

  3. Next, using the same paint brush, add a thin layer of flesh-colored acrylic paint to the whole memo holder and dry the memo holder thoroughly with the hairdryer. Memo Holder 2

  4. With the PhotoScape program, turn the color of the clipart into sepia. This will give the picture an aged look. Then, click on the Bright/Color Button, choose the Contrast Enhancement option and click on Low.

  5. From the different frames that could be added to the picture, choose the Gradient08 frame.

  6. Save the adjusted picture onto your computer. Then, print the picture via PhotoScape: Print 4 pictures using the 5 x 7 cm size option. Print 1 picture using the 3 inches x 4 inches size option.

  7. From the brown paper, tear a piece of paper that would fit the inside bottom of the memo holder. Also tear strips of paper that would fit around the outsides of the side panels.

  8. Cut out the pictures and decide how they will be placed on the memo holder.

  9. With the 10/32 inch brush, paint a substantial amount of Deco Art Glue to the back of the piece of brown paper that was torn for the inside bottom of the memo holder. Turn the piece of brown paper around and put it in position on the inside bottom of the memo holder, but do not press it down. Memo Holder Step 2

  10. With the brush, spread glue to the front of the piece of brown paper, lightly applying pressure so that it will stick to the memo holder.

  11. Working from the middle of the piece of paper, and from inside towards the outside, rub out all the air bubbles and excess glue from the back of the piece of paper. Use an old cloth to clear any excess glue from the memo holder.

  12. Use the hairdryer to dry the piece of paper thoroughly.

  13. Repeat steps 9-12 with the other pieces of paper, gluing these in place around the outsides of the side panels.

  14. Repeat steps 9-12 with the bigger picture, gluing this in place in the inside bottom of the memo holder. Memo Holder Step 3

  15. Then, repeat steps 9-12 with the smaller pictures, gluing these in place on the outsides of the side panels. Memo Holder Step 5

  16. Glue the photo corners onto the corners of the memo box. Memo Holder Step 4

  17. Using the fan-shaped paint brush, give the memo holder a wash with the old gold-colored acrylic paint. Remember not to use too much paint when using a fan-shaped brush, as this will lose the fan-shaped effect ~ remove excess paint by dabbing it on a sheet of newspaper before starting to paint.

  18. Dry the memo holder thoroughly with the hairdryer.

  19. With the 10/32 inch brush, paint a thin layer of Modge Podge over the whole memo holder. The Modge Podge will protect the pictures and give the product a smoother finish.

  20. Dry the memo holder thoroughly with the hairdryer.

  21. Repeat steps 18-19 ~ you need to apply at least 5 coats of Modge Podge, but remember that with every layer, the direction in which the Modge Podge is applied, must be changed from horizontal to vertical to horizontal, etc. Also, remember that after every layer of Modge Podge, the memo holder must first be dried thoroughly with the hairdryer.

  22. With the 10/32 inch brush, add a layer of water-based varnish to the memo holder and dry with the hairdryer.

  23. Use the strong bonding glue to glue the photo corners in place.

Tips:

  • To clean, wipe gently with a wet cloth and do not use strong detergents.

  • When doing decoupage, do not use the highest heat setting on the hairdryer.

By BessieBessie from Pretoria, Gauteng

Tip: A Gift Frame For Earrings

A friend will be celebrating her birthday soon and I wanted to give her a pair of earrings, but in an interesting way. So I decoupaged a frame, added the velvety paper and glued on a large chunk of cork, stuck the earrings into it and wah la! I placed the glass and paper from the frame behind the velvet paper so my friend will be able to use the frame as a frame later on. I work a lot with frames and find them an interesting 'canvas'.

By Lisa from Thessaloniki, Greece

Tip: Decoupaged Box Lid Using Old Calendar Pages

A decopauged box from a calendar.This is a paper mache box bought at WalMart, painted outside blue and inside off white.

I like to save my calendars, I really like Victorian, farms and landscapes.

Here is one that I just measured for the lid and cut it out. I used decoupage glue to affix to the top of lid and added more decoupage glue to the lid.

Then I added rick rack to the border and used more decoupage glue to hold it in place. Then I went over it several times with craft clear varnish.

It looks like a painting.

By Sherry from Valdosta, GA

Tip: Decoupage Tip

For decoupage, use a diluted solution of ordinary white glue to seal in the decorative paper you have applied to your object. It dries to a nice, shiny surface.

By Pam from Los Angeles

Decoupaged Glass Vases

These easy decorated vases and jars make great candle holders for Valentine's Day. Any recycled glass jar would work. We used both regular tea lights and the battery operated ones. At least one of these projects is going to be a gift for Grandma.

Approximate Time: 1 hour (plus overnight to dry)Decoupaged Glass Vases

Supplies:

  • colored tissue paper
  • Collage-Podge
  • clean dry glass vase or jar
  • foam brush

Collage-Podge is a glue, sealer and finisher. If you are using Mod-Podge or white glue instead of Collage-Podge, apply a finishing sealant coat before using.

Steps:

  1. Start with a clean dry glass vase or jar. Tear some colored tissue paper into small pieces (about the size of a large coin).
  2. Using the foam brush and some of the glue in a dish, attach the tissue paper to the outside of the vase. If you make a mistake, simply add more tissue paper to camouflage it.

    Glue

    We found that adding a coat of glue to the vase and then attaching the tissue paper worked well but sometimes we would put the glue on the paper and then brush over it on the vase. Develop your own favorite technique.Applying Tissue Paper

  3. Use the straight edges of the tissue paper to make a clean line at the top.Vase
  4. Feel free to add paper cutouts, glitter or any other accessories to the vase. We used glitter tissue paper for this purpose, with regular paper behind it to help it punch up the thin paper.

    Cutouts

    You can use pictures out of a magazine too; flowers or hearts would be appropriate for Valentine's Day.CutoutRed Tissue Paper Vase

  5. Allow to fully dry, probably overnight. These vases should not be washed or used with water. They are purely decorative.Dry
Pink Vase

By

We thought about covering the top of the jars with glued on beads. Ribbons or other decorations would also add to the project.

Tip: Fall Decorated Pumpkins With Mod Podge

My daughter and I have recently discovered Mod podge semi-gloss (thanks to Martha S.). We used it on all assorted size pumpkins, and used glitter or crepe paper. Tonight we're going to use fall leaves from our yard.

You apply mod podge all over the pumpkin, then apply whatever you're using then go over it again with the mod podge. Not too thick or it will look like school glue when it dries in cracks.

We used darker colors, like burnt orange, brown, even a darker pink. Any color you think for fall, adding bows to the stems, I double mine so they look fuller. They should last though Thanksgiving. It's a great decorating idea. We are also going pumpkin shopping now that they're on clearance. Use your imagination.

Source: Martha S.

By "A" from Wheeling, WV

Decoupage Ornamental Ball

Decoupage is the art of pasting paper. Wildly popular during Victorian times, it can be a wonderful way to create many different styles of art. It's also a great way to recycle almost any kind of paper. Here are the basics about the art and a simple project to get you started. Decoupage Balls

Supplies:

  • Styrofoam ball - 1, about 3 inches big
  • gift wrapping paper - striped
  • gift wrapping ribbon - blue, 1/2 inch thick and 6 feet long
  • scissors
  • white glue
  • paintbrush
  • Popsicle stick
  • varnish/sealer

Instructions:

Learning the basics of decoupage is a breeze. The paper can be glued to almost any surface and any shape. The exact look is entirely up to you, and there are no ugly results, everything comes out with at least a little charm.

To decoupage you need scissors, white glue, paper, a paintbrush, a Popsicle stick, some water, and an object to decorate. You can decoupage another piece of paper, a wooden block, a plastic picture frame, a Styrofoam ball, or just about anything.

  1. Use the scissors to cut small shapes from your paper. You can make the shapes angular, with square and rectangle shaped pieces from a magazine, or you can cut out the exact shape, like a daisy shaped piece of wrapping paper.
  2. Mix your basic white glue with a tiny drop of water and mix well.
  3. Dip your paintbrush into the glue and spread it on the back of a piece of paper.
  4. Apply the paper to the object being decorated. It's very important that you always lay the paper flat, without any rips or wrinkles.
  5. Use the Popsicle stick to gently smooth out the paper, applying it perfectly to the object. If a piece of paper is acting stubborn, brush a little of the glue-water over the piece of paper and smooth with the stick.
  6. Keep repeating this process until the entire item is covered with paper.
  7. Let dry.
  8. Once everything is dry, you may want to add some "focal-point" paper pieces to the object. "Focal-point" pieces help tie together the picture or give it a specific look. Let's say you cut squares out of striped wrapping paper as your main decoration. Then you cut some beautiful dolls out of a catalogue, following their exact shape, and paste them in the middle. A beautiful finish to a wonderful piece of art.
  9. Once everything is glued and dried, you want to give the object a thin, even coat of the glue. This will help any stray ends stick down and protect the paper.
  10. Let dry.
  11. If you want heavy protection, use a clear, waterproof sealer on the object.
  12. Let dry.
Decoupage Balls

Decoupage Ornamental Ball - 2

Supplies:

  • Styrofoam Ball - 1, about 3 inches big
  • striped gift wrapping paper
  • blue gift wrapping ribbon - 1/4 inch thick, 6 feet long
  • scissors
  • white glue
  • paintbrush
  • varnish
  • Popsicle stick

Instructions:

  1. Cut paper into small squares.
  2. Glue papers smoothly over Styrofoam ball using decoupage techniques.
  3. Let dry.
  4. Cut four pieces from the ribbon, each 1 foot long. You are going to wrap these around the ball, as shown on the left side of the finished project picture.
  5. Carefully glue the ribbon on, sweep some glue over the ribbon, smooth, and let dry. Some ribbons may be stubborn and take a few rounds to truly stick.
  6. Cover ball in a coat of glue-water mixture and let dry.
  7. Next, cover the ball in an even coat of shiny varnish and let dry.
  8. You could just stop the craft now and put the ball in a basket as a decoration. But it's easy to make the ball into an ornament, perfect for something like a Christmas tree. Use the remaining 2 feet of ribbon to tie a loop and some curly strands to the top of the ball, as shown on the right side of the finished project picture. Glue ribbon and let dry.

Note: Once you have the basics of cutting and pasting down, you can take decoupage to the next level. By using paints, varnishes, beads, or foil, you can make much more intricate and unique looking pieces of art. Don't be afraid to play around. Remember, anything that looks terrible could just have a piece of cut paper pasted over it.

By Aysha from Boise, ID

Tip: Using Tissue Paper To Update A Lamp

I changed my living room and my table lamps won't match, they were peach ceramic. I cleaned the ceramic with alcohol and then I put a thin layer of Elmers' glue and, with tissue paper which I crushed with my hands forming a ball, unfold the paper and press on the glued surface all around. After it is completely dried, paint it with a water based stain in any color you like. I first painted it with white. After completely dried, I used a maple stain, and finally a darker color. It came out wonderful and I can use my lamps again. They look like I just bought them.

By Sol from Miami, FL

Halloween Plate

Halloween decorated plate.This plate is both inexpensive and easy to make. My 9 year old daughter made this one. Here is what you need:

Materials

  • 1 clear glass dessert plate (easily found a dollar store)
  • themed paper napkins (also found at a dollar store)
  • 1 foam paintbrush
  • Mod Podge (found at craft stores)
  • scissors

Instructions

  1. Cover your work area with newspaper.
  2. Be sure you wash and dry the plate thoroughly before starting.
  3. Use scissors to cut out pictures from the napkins.
  4. Place the plate face down on the newspaper. With the foam brush, put a thin layer of glue on the plate. Place the napkin pictures on top of the glue. Be sure to pay attention to which side of the picture you are placing into the glue. You want to be sure you are placing the pictures right side down on the back of the plate, since you will be looking through the plate at the pictures once it is finished. Continue putting the pictures on the plate until you are satisfied with the appearance.
  5. Use the foam brush to cover the entire back of the plate with more Mod Podge, sealing the pictures in place. Seal with 2-3 more coats of Mod Podge, allowing to dry the amount of time suggested on the bottle in between coats.
  6. Once the plate is dry, you can turn it over and even eat off of it. Handwash only.
  7. By Michele from East Bethel, MN

Slate That Looks Painted

Materials:

  • 1 piece of slate any size or shape you want
  • rub on transfers
  • Modge Podge sealer

Instructions:

  1. If you are like me, I haven't learned how to paint but love the look. Take a slate and go to craft store and find the rub on transfers that you like, I love bears thus my selection.
  2. Just follow instructions on transfers which consists of rubbing over transfer with Popsicle stick.
  3. When you have added all that you would like on slate, just seal with Modge Podge to protect the rub-ons and make a shiny coat.
  4. This can also be done on wood although I would recommend you put a coat of paint on the wood before the rub-on transfer.

By Carol from MA

Decoupage Jug

Supplies

  • empty clean jug
  • paper bags, new ones, not used!
  • Royal Coat Glue
  • clear acrylic craft paint
  • foam paint brush
Decoupaged jug.

Instructions

  1. Tear paper bags into pieces.
  2. Use Royal Coat Glue starting just inside top of bottle. Go around bottle, leaving handle alone - you can hold onto it this way. Go around the jug, overlapping your pieces. The glue goes on the back of each piece of paper, apply paper down to bottom, let dry overnight.
  3. Now do the handle and let dry an hour or so - you need smaller thin strips for handle. After the handle is dry, do the bottom.
  4. You can print a fun saying, a picture, or your state. Print it out, and glue to bottle. Google has images of anything you want to print out.
  5. Put on 3 coats of Royal Coat Glue on your bottle, letting each coat dry well.
  6. Use clear acrylic craft paint all over the bottle letting each of the 3 coats dry first.
  7. I filled mine up with red clay and put a cork in the top.
  8. The decoupage jug makes a nice doorstop.
  9. By starlight2007 from GA

Tip: Making Pill Boxes With Decoupage

You can make nice little pill boxes for the purse by saving nice small containers and decoupaging pictures on the lid with diluted white glue (then sealing it with clear nail polish.) I had a lovely one once made out of an old lens case. Good for Christmas presents!

By Pam from Los Angeles

Cup Saucer Decoupaged Picture Frame

Have saucers without a cup? Take the saucers and cut a family picture to fit and glue it in the middle. Decorate around the picture in some form and let dry. Then give it a coating of decoupage. Let dry and re-do. Slip it in a decoupaged box, decorated by you. Add a pretty bow.

By Gladys

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Questions

Here are questions related to Decoupage Craft Ideas.

Question: Decoupaging Old Metal TV Trays

I have some old metal TV trays that I want to refurbish. What are the steps that I should take to prepare them to be decoupaged?

By Karen from Luthersburg, PA


Most Recent Answer

By kuna02/16/2014

I found a set of 1950s metal TV trays at a yard sale. First I cleaned and then sanded the tops that were previously painted. Then I applied a good primer, then painted the tops black. I used black and white images to decoupage and finished with 10 coats of water based polyurethane. I also used fine steel wool on the legs to freshen them up. They turned out great.

RE: Decoupaging Old Metal TV Trays

Question: What is Decoupage?

What is decoupage?

By April from Whittier, CA


Most Recent Answer

By Catherine04/15/2011

Hello ! Decoupage is the french word for cutting out from french verb "couper" which means to cut. If you type "decoupage artistique" as key word in google image search you will see some amazing paper crafts.

Catherine

RE: What is Decoupage?