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ThriftyFun News - May 27, 2005 - Memorial Day BBQ Tips

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ThriftyFun News
Memorial Day BBQ Tips

Volume Seven, Number 21 May 27, 2005
http://www.ThriftyFun.com

Hello,

In today's TF News we have some Memorial Day BBQ Tips and recipes. Hope you enjoy them. We also have created a schedule for upcoming issues. If you have any tips to provide for these future issues, feel free to submit them on the contest form.

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* Inexpensive Summer Activities for Kids (6/3)

Thank you to Julie for this suggestion. Ideas to help entertain kids during the long summer.

* Recycled Crafts (6/10)

Cool ideas for making crafts out of recycled items.

* Computer Maintenance Tips (6/17)

Dealing with spam, keep your computer clean, and any other information about keeping your computer well maintained and as secure as possible. Thank you to Coolchinchilla for this suggestion.

* Container Gardening (6/24)

Information and tips about gardening in containers.

* Saving Money Digital Cameras - Tips and Advice (7/1)

Tips and advice about saving money using digital cameras. Picture taking tips, printer picture tips, organizing digital photos and more. Thank you to Coolchinchilla for this suggestion.

* Creating a Budget and Budgeting Software Reviews (7/8)

Advice about budgeting including software reviews. Is there a program you swear by? Tell us about it. Also any other budgeting tips and resources would be approriates. Thank you to Coolchinchilla for this suggestion.

* Cool Summer Recipes (7/15)

Recipes that don't require turning on the oven. Tasty recipes for the summer months.

If anyone else has a topic to recommend, feel free to suggest it on our contact form.

Thanks for reading,

Susan

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This newsletter contains:

  • Barbecue Food Safety
  • Grilling Pork Chops
  • Spray Bottle For Outside Grilling
  • Meat Grilling Tips
  • Extra Flavor for the Grill
  • Preventing Barbecue Flare-ups
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  • Brushing on the BBQ Sauce
  • Frugal Outdoor Cooking!
  • GAS, CHARCOAL or BOTH: The Benefits of Grilling With Gas or Charcoal
  • Barbeque Grilling
  • 10 Smoky Tips To BBQ Food Safely
  • Cookout Tip: Cut Burgers in Half
  • Homemade Barbecue Sauce
  • Baked Beans
  • Grilled Iowa Chops
  • Barbeque Rub For Meat
  • Quick Barbeque Sauce With Ketchup and Cola
  • Southern Barbecue Sauce
  • Barbequed Spareribs
  • Baked Beans Hawaiian
  • Stay Cool: Cook Corn and Kabobs Outside
  • A HILL OF BEANS - BAKED BEANS THAT IS

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Memorial Day BBQ Tips


Barbecue Food Safety

Cooking outdoors was once only a summer activity shared with family and friends. Now more than half of Americans say they are cooking outdoors year round. So whether the snow is blowing or the sun is shining brightly, it's important to follow food safety guidelines to prevent harmful bacteria from multiplying and causing foodborne illness. Use these simple guidelines for grilling food safely.

From the Store: Home First
When shopping, buy cold food like meat and poultry last, right before checkout. Separate raw meat and poultry from other food in your shopping cart. To guard against cross-contamination -- which can happen when raw meat or poultry juices drip on other food -- put packages of raw meat and poultry into plastic bags.

Plan to drive directly home from the grocery store. You may want to take a cooler with ice for perishables. Always refrigerate perishable food within 2 hours. Refrigerate within 1 hour when the temperature is above 90°F.

At home, place meat and poultry in the refrigerator immediately. Freeze poultry and ground meat that won't be used in 1 or 2 days; freeze other meat within 4 to 5 days.

Defrost Safely
Completely defrost meat and poultry before grilling so it cooks more evenly. Use the refrigerator for slow, safe thawing or thaw sealed packages in cold water. You can microwave defrost if the food will be placed immediately on the grill.

Marinating
Meat and poultry can be marinated for several hours or days to tenderize or add flavor. Marinate food in the refrigerator, not on the counter. If some of the marinade is to be used as a sauce on the cooked food, reserve a portion of the marinade before putting raw meat and poultry in it. However, if the marinade used on raw meat or poultry is to be reused, make sure to let it come to a boil first to destroy any harmful bacteria.

Transporting
When carrying food to another location, keep it cold to minimize bacterial growth. Use an insulated cooler with sufficient ice or ice packs to keep the food at 40°F or below. Pack food right from the refrigerator into the cooler immediately before leaving home. Keep the cooler in the coolest part of the car.

Keep Cold Food Cold
Keep meat and poultry refrigerated until ready to use. Only take out the meat and poultry that will immediately be placed on the grill.

When using a cooler, keep it out of the direct sun by placing it in the shade or shelter. Avoid opening the lid too often, which lets cold air out and warm air in. Pack beverages in one cooler and perishables in a separate cooler.

Keep Everything Clean
Be sure there are plenty of clean utensils and platters. To prevent foodborne illness, don't use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked meat and poultry. Harmful bacteria present in raw meat and poultry and their juices can contaminate safely cooked food.

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If you're eating away from home, find out if there's a source of clean water. If not, bring water for preparation and cleaning. Or pack clean cloths, and wet towelettes for cleaning surfaces and hands.

Precooking
Precooking food partially in the microwave, oven, or stove is a good way of reducing grilling time. Just make sure that the food goes immediately on the preheated grill to complete cooking.

Cook Thoroughly
Cook food to a safe internal temperature to destroy harmful bacteria. Meat and poultry cooked on a grill often browns very fast on the outside. Use a food thermometer to be sure the food has reached a safe internal temperature. Whole poultry should reach 180°F; breasts, 170°F. Hamburgers made of ground beef should reach 160°F; ground poultry, 165°F. Beef, veal, and lamb steaks, roasts and chops can be cooked to 145°F. All cuts of pork should reach 160°F.

NEVER partially grill meat or poultry and finish cooking later.

Reheating
When reheating fully cooked meats like hot dogs, grill to 165°F or until steaming hot.

Keep Hot Food Hot
After cooking meat and poultry on the grill, keep it hot until served - at 140°F or warmer.

Keep cooked meats hot by setting them to the side of the grill rack, not directly over the coals where they could overcook. At home, the cooked meat can be kept hot in a warm oven (approximately 200°F), in a chafing dish or slow cooker, or on a warming tray.

Serving the Food
When taking food off the grill, use a clean platter. Don't put cooked food on the same platter that held raw meat or poultry. Any harmful bacteria present in the raw meat juices could contaminate safely cooked food.

In hot weather (above 90°F), food should never sit out for more than 1 hour.

Leftovers
Refrigerate any leftovers promptly in shallow containers. Discard any food left out more than 2 hours (1 hour if temperatures are above 90°F).

Safe Smoking
Smoking is cooking food indirectly in the presence of a fire. It can be done in a covered grill if a pan of water is placed beneath the meat on the grill; and meats can be smoked in a "smoker," which is an outdoor cooker especially designed for smoking foods. Smoking is done much more slowly than grilling, so less tender meats benefit from this method, and a natural smoke flavoring permeates the meat. The temperature in the smoker should be maintained at 250 to 300°F for safety.

Use a food thermometer to be sure the food has reached a safe internal temperature.

Pit Roasting
Pit roasting is cooking meat in a large, level hole dug in the earth. A hardwood fire is built in the pit, requiring wood equal to about 2 1/2 times the volume of the pit. The hardwood is allowed to burn until the wood reduces and the pit is half filled with burning coals. This can require 4 to 6 hours burning time.

Cooking may require 10 to 12 hours or more and is difficult to estimate. A meat thermometer must be used to determine the meat's safety and doneness. There are many variables such as outdoor temperature, the size and thickness of the meat, and how fast the coals are cooking.

Does Grilling Pose a Cancer Risk?
Some studies suggest there may be a cancer risk related to eating food cooked by high-heat cooking techniques as grilling, frying, and broiling. Based on present research findings, eating moderate amounts of grilled meats like fish, meat, and poultry cooked -- without charring -- to a safe temperature does not pose a problem.

To prevent charring, remove visible fat that can cause a flare-up. Precook meat in the microwave immediately before placing it on the grill to release some of the juices that can drop on coals. Cook food in the center of the grill and move coals to the side to prevent fat and juices from dripping on them. Cut charred portions off the meat.

April 2003

Source: USDA

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Grilling Pork Chops

When grilling pork chops, it's very important to have the heat hot enough to be able to hear the meat sizzling over the coals. While steaks need to be cooked on a very hot fire. Let the flames come up around the steak to seal in the natural juices.

By Terri H.

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Spray Bottle For Outside Grilling

When grilling outside, keep a spray bottle of water to control the flames of the grill. Don't pour water onto the charcoal as it cools the temperature which will have to reheat before cooking continues.

By Terri H.

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Meat Grilling Tips

Tips for grilling meat. Post your ideas.

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Extra Flavor for the Grill

To add extra flavor while grilling, save the loose skin on onions and garlic to toss into the fire just before grilling meats or vegetables. And throw dry fennel tops on the fire when grilling fish.

By Brenda Cole

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Quick Barbeque Sauce With Ketchup and Cola

For a quick BBQ sauce mix one cup of ketchup with one cup of a cola soda drink. Mix over medium heat till thickened. Can double and triple this recipe. I usually put chicken breasts in the crock pot and let them cook till done, then drain the liquid off and pour the sauce in to coat the chicken just before serving. Can also grill or bake in the oven with this.

By Melanie

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Preventing Barbecue Flare-ups

To prevent flare-ups when barbecuing, spread lettuce leaves on hot coals before barbecuing fatty meat. Lettuce will blacken but not ignite.

By June Gillespie

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Brushing on the BBQ Sauce

Do you use barbecue sauce on meat, poultry or even fish? I purchased a package of 3 brushes at the dollar store in our area and use one at a time to spread the sauce on the protein that I am grilling. After using it I then wash it well with liquid dish detergent and make sure that I rinse well. I then let the brush air dry and then place it in a baggie and label it barbecue sauce brush. I get a lot of uses from one but when it is time to retire it I have a new one waiting for me. Such a bargain - 3 for $1.

Happy barbecuing.

By joesgirl

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Frugal Outdoor Cooking!
By Cyndi Roberts

Firing up the grill is a great way to cook in the summer! Here are a few grilling tips and a couple of recipes, too.

For great grilled burgers, form the patty gently. Smashing the meat forces out moisture.

Sear both sides of the burger on both sides, then move the burger and cook with indirect heat till done.

Use a meat thermometer to gauge when the meat is done. Ground beef should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees.

When grilling chicken, remember that dark meat needs longer on the grill than breast meat. Also, bone-in parts cook longer than boneless parts.

Place the pieces that need to cook the longest on the grill first, and then move them to a cooler area of the grill to finish cooking after they have browned.

Again, use a meat thermometer to tell when chicken is done. Bone-in parts should be cooked to an internal temperature of 170 degrees; boneless parts to about 160 degrees.


Tropical Glaze for Grilled Chicken

  • 1 small can crushed pineapple
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon mustard

Drain pineapple, reserving 2 tablespoons of juice. Mix pineapple, reserved juice, brown sugar, lemon juice and mustard.

Brush chicken parts with glaze often during last 10 minutes of grilling.


Barbecue Sauce

  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon celery seed
  • 2 or 3 dashes hot pepper sauce (optional)

Mix all ingredients in saucepan; bring mixture to boil over medium heat. Simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes.

Use to baste burgers or pork chops during last 10-15 minutes of grilling.

Always be sure to cook on a clean grill. If you have a gas grill, leave it on for a couple of minutes after you finish cooking, with the lid down. If you have a charcoal grill, just close the lid and let it burn out. Then you can scrub the grate with a wad of aluminum foil.

Be sure not to cook at too high a temperature and don't lift the lid and peek too many times. You'll just be adding to the cooking time, because the temperature will be lowered.


For a great warm weather dessert, try this cool fruit combination.

  • 1 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Stir together and spoon over sliced fresh bananas.

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GAS, CHARCOAL or BOTH: The Benefits of Grilling With Gas or Charcoal
By The Reluctant Gourmet

One of my boyhood memories is of watching my Dad struggle on the weekends to start a charcoal fire with lighter fluid (gasoline when there was no lighter fluid around). Looking back, I don't think we ever used the grill except on weekends because of his work schedule.

He would wait around for the fire to get hot before grilling up some chicken pieces or hamburgers but my dad is one of those guys who can't sit still. So he would get involved in some other project that had to be done and forget about the fire. When he came back and found the coals burned out, he would say something under his breath and start all over again.

Now that I'm a dad myself grilling for my own family, I have the choice of either gas or charcoal. At the moment, I use a gas grill -- I love how easy it is to turn on the gas valve, hit the ignite button and instantaneously have a fire. But I'm very close to picking up an inexpensive charcoal grill that I can use on the weekends. Maybe it's getting your hands dirty arranging the charcoal, the time standing around watching the coals get hot or even the smell of the charcoal burning. Whatever it is, there is something nostalgic about grilling with charcoal that I want to experience again.

Yeah sure there is more clean up, you have to get rid of the used up coals. And then there is always the possibility that the coals will burn out in the middle of cooking. That wouldn't happen with a gas grill, although there was a time I couldn't figure out why my steaks were taking so long to cook until I realized the gas tank had run out.

But there are also a lot of benefits to grilling with charcoal, which leads me to this article. I wanted to look at the pros and cons of grilling with charcoal and figure out how they affect my style of cooking. I'm not even going to approach electric grilling but it's something you may want to check out for yourself some time.

I put the question of gas vs. charcoal to a couple of my professional chef friends who had opposite positions. Although their preferences were different, they both came up with great reasons why they choose their style.

One chef listened quietly while I ranted about the virtues of gas grilling, waited until I was finished, and then said, "Yes, charcoal grills are more work and what type of grill you use will depend on your lifestyle and the amount of time you have available, but in the end you can't compare gas grilling to charcoal grilling. Forget about it, charcoal wins hands down."

When I asked why he was so enthusiast toward charcoal he said, "Because with charcoal, you add more flavor and you can make a hotter fire and heat is your friend."

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The other chef I spoke with favored a gas grill for the convenience and felt you could achieve the same great tasting food by various cooking methods, food prep, and the use of woods for a smoky flavor.

Who's right? In my opinion there is no right answer and it really just depends on personal preferences. It really depends on your lifestyle and how often you plan to use the grill. Look at my list of benefits for both gas and charcoal to see which fits best into your lifestyle.

Benefits of Gas and Charcoal Grills

Gas

  • Push Button Convenience
  • No messy charcoal to deal with
  • Easy to start
  • Control temperature with a dial
  • Control temperatures for longer periods of time
  • Can still use wood for smoky flavor
  • Wind is not a factor

Charcoal

  • More heat
  • Hotter grill
  • Flavor from charcoal
  • More intense smells
  • More hands-on experience

For more tips on grilling and some simple techniques to take the guess work out, visit my web site at

http://www.reluctantgourmet.com/grilling.htm.

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Barbeque Grilling
By Valerie Giles

Grilling on the barbecue has never been more exciting. Not only do barbecues come in a myriad of designs and options, but also with the advent of popular cooking shows, cooking books and magazines, grilling has reached a whole new realm. Grilling is no longer just about steaks and burgers, barbecue grilling is full of adventurous and elegant recipes and menu plans. Some of the tantalizing grilling recipes have names like grilled mango blossom, grilled portobello's with avocado salsa and grilled beef tenderloin with cabernet sauvignon sauce.

You'll want to familiarize yourself with the barbecuing grilling basics before you start. The two most popular types of grilling are the indirect and direct grilling methods. The indirect method is a slow cooking process because less heat is used. One suggestion for indirect cooking is to use a disposable drip pan or foil placed underneath the food to be cooked, using tongs arrange the coals around the pan. The food is cooked by the hot air circulating around the food (similar to a convection oven) this process is great for cooking roasts. It's always a good idea to check with your owner manual for your specific barbeque.

The direct grilling method is achieved by arranging the coals (with long handled tongs) to spread evenly in a single layer, extending about one inch beyond the area of food. The food is then placed directly over fire. The direct grilling method is fast because of the intense heat and allows for quick browning on the outside of foods. Direct grilling works best for food requiring short cooking times, such as burgers and steaks. It's important to turn over food to allow cooking of both sides.

The three most popular ways of adding flavor to your selected grilling foods are with sauces, marinades and rubs. The sauce can be said to define a great barbecue, you can use a little sauce or a lot. A sample recipe for sauce is this maple barbecue sauce; combine equal amounts of maple syrup, ketchup and white wine add garlic, salt, pepper, thyme, basil, ginger and chili powder with a bay leaf, bring ingredients to a boil then reduce and let simmer. A sauce should be brushed on in the last five to ten minutes of grilling as the sugar can cause the sauce to burn. There are a wide variety of barbecue sauces and recipes available.

Marinades are another way to change a mediocre meal into incredible. They are an excellent way to add flavor while tenderizing and promoting crisp brown exteriors. The three basic ingredients in marinades are flavorings (herbs, spices and sweeteners), oils and acids (citrus juices, wines, vinegars and yogurts). A simple marinade recipe is the lemon rosemary marinade. Mix shredded lemon peel, lemon juice, olive oil, sugar, white wine, rosemary, salt and pepper and pour over your selected meat, tofu, or vegetables in either a plastic sealable bag or shallow dish and refrigerate for one to two hours, remembering to shake bag or flip in dish half way through marinating process.

Rubs are a wonderful bold blend of seasonings, which are just as the name implies rubbed directly into the food. The food is rubbed with spices prior to grilling, transforming the rub into a crunchy brown crust that seals in the juices and enhances the flavors. A very basic rub recipe is this herb rub; equal amounts of dried rosemary, dried thyme, dried minced onion, dried minced garlic, with smaller amounts of salt and pepper combine all ingredients in a food processor until coarsely ground. Sprinkle mixture evenly over meat, then rub in with fingers. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator for 15 minutes to two hours, and then grill.

When outdoor grilling there are a few simple things to remember in order to avoid any contamination of food. Any marinated food should be kept in the refrigerator (not on the counter) to prevent giving bacteria a chance to grow. Set some marinade aside at the beginning, and never reuse any marinade that has been used on raw meat. Always keep vegetable and fruits separate from raw meat; utensils and plates should also be washed before using. Be sure to properly cook all meats. Serve food immediately, so hot foods don't have too much time to cool and to start growing bacteria. Perishable foods should not be left out of the refrigerator for more than two hours, and if the outdoor temperature is more than 85 degrees or hotter serve within an hour.

Grilling vegetable is an excellent way to bring out seasonal flavors. Vegetables and fruits such as; eggplant, bell peppers, summer squashes, sweet onions, roma or cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, mangoes, pineapple or peaches are all excellent choices for grilling. Cut vegetables into half inch slices or large chunks. Brush with some olive oil (may be seasoned with garlic or other selected herbs). Grill the vegetables until tender, turning only once. Fruit should be halved with pits removed, and grilled until tender (no oil is needed), with the pulp side down. Vegetable cooking sprays or small amounts of oil will prevent the vegetables from sticking (avoid spraying vegetable near lighted grill). Marinating the vegetable beforehand also makes the vegetables easier to handle and less likely to stick to your grill surface.

Grilling corn on the cob cooked in the cornhusks (without the corn silk) is a unique and tasty alternative to boiled corn. Peel back cornhusks and put butter and herbs around the corn. Fold over cornhusks and tie with kitchen string. Grill the corn for approximately thirty minutes, remembering to turn the corn about three times.

A simple and elegant meal might consist of a grilled pizza and some grilled fruit crisp for dessert. To grill a pizza use a store bought Italian bread shell cover with pesto, thinly sliced plum tomatoes, yellow tomatoes, kalamata olives and basil (drizzling olive oil over top). Use tin foil folded in half placing the pizza on top folding up the edges of tin foil up to the edges of the pizza. Using the indirect method of grilling, grill the pizza for about 10 minutes. For the grilled fruit crisp dessert, mix peaches, pineapple tidbits and brown sugar spooning into a metal baking foil pan. Then combine larger amounts of brown sugar, flour and butter with a touch of cinnamon and nutmeg sprinkling over top of fruit mixture. Grill about fifty minutes (indirect grilling method) or until hot and bubbly, serve with ice cream if desired.

Outdoor grilling is a convenient and nice alternative to cooking indoors. The options of menus are limitless. Grilling is one of the easiest and most tantalizing low fat ways of cooking. Whether you stick to the time honored steak and burgers or go for something a bit more adventurous, grilling is always a tasty and enjoyable way to be outdoors with family and friends.

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10 Smoky Tips To BBQ Food Safely
By Terry Nicholls

Cooking outdoors was once only a summer activity shared with family and friends. Now more than half of Americans say they are cooking outdoors year round. Use these simple guidelines for grilling food safely to prevent harmful bacteria from multiplying and causing food-borne illness.

1. Defrosting

Completely defrost meat and poultry before grilling so it cooks more evenly. Use the refrigerator for slow, safe thawing or thaw sealed packages in cold water. You can microwave defrost if the food will be placed immediately on the grill.

2. Marinating

Meat and poultry can be marinated for several hours or days to tenderize or add flavor. Be sure to marinate food in the refrigerator, not on the counter. If some of the marinade is to be used as a sauce on the cooked food, reserve a portion of the marinade before putting raw meat and poultry in it. However, if the marinade used on raw meat or poultry is to be reused, make sure to let it come to a boil first to destroy any harmful bacteria.

3. Transporting

When carrying food to another location, keep it cold to minimize bacterial growth. Use an insulated cooler with sufficient ice or ice packs to keep the food at 40° F or below. Pack food right from the refrigerator into the cooler immediately before leaving home. Keep the cooler in the coolest part of the car.

4. Keep Cold Food Cold

When using a cooler, keep it out of the direct sun by placing it in the shade or shelter. Avoid opening the lid too often, which lets cold air out and warm air in. Pack beverages in one cooler & perishables in a separate cooler.

5. Keep Everything Clean

Be sure there are plenty of clean utensils and platters. To prevent food-borne illness, don't use the same platter and utensils for raw and cooked meat and poultry. Harmful bacteria present in raw meat and poultry and their juices can contaminate safely cooked food.

6. Cook Thoroughly

Cook food to a safe internal temperature to destroy harmful bacteria. Meat and poultry cooked on a grill often browns very fast on the outside. Use a food thermometer to be sure the food has reached a safe internal temperature. Whole poultry should reach 180° F; breasts, 170° F. Hamburgers made of ground beef should reach 160° F; ground poultry, 165° F. Beef, veal, and lamb steaks, roasts and chops can be cooked to 145° F. All cuts of pork should reach 160° F. NEVER partially grill meat or poultry and finish cooking later.

7. Keep Hot Food Hot

After cooking meat and poultry on the grill, keep it hot until served -- at 140° F or warmer. Keep cooked meats hot by setting them to the side of the grill rack, not directly over the coals where they could overcook. At home, the cooked meat can be kept hot in a warm oven (approximately 200° F), in a chafing dish or slow cooker, or on a warming tray.

8. Serving Safely

When taking food off the grill, use a clean platter. Don't put cooked food on the same platter that held raw meat or poultry. Any harmful bacteria present in the raw meat juices could contaminate safely cooked food.

9. Safe Smoking

Smoking is done much more slowly than grilling, so less tender meats benefit from this method, and a natural smoke flavoring permeates the meat. The temperature in the smoker should be maintained at 250° F to 300° F for safety. Use a food thermometer to be sure the food has reached a safe internal temperature.

10. Pit Roasting

Cooking may require 10 to 12 hours or more and is difficult to estimate. A meat thermometer must be used to determine the meat's safety and doneness. There are many variables such as outdoor temperature, the size and thickness of the meat, and how fast the coals are cooking.

View Article: Click Here


Cookout Tip: Cut Burgers in Half

When serving food at cookouts, go ahead and put some of the hamburgers on buns, then cut them in half before placing on the serving platter. This helps cut down on the number of kids who take a whole burger, and then waste half of it.

By Becki in Indiana

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Homemade Barbecue Sauce

My husband and I make an easy barbecue sauce (a thin brush-on type, not the thick kind) that is great for summer cookouts. It works good on chicken and pork (esp. ribs!), and you can even use it on steaks. Use the cheapest brands for all the ingredients. Believe me, it tastes better than the store-bought BBQ sauces! Here's how to make it:

In a stainless steel pot, combine:

  • 1 cup ketchup
  • 1/2 cup mustard
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 2 cups apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • a liberal dash of hot pepper sauce
  • 2 cups water

Mix and cook all the ingredients about an hr. over low heat. BBQ sauce will be thin, not thick, and can be brushed over grilling meats. Store in refrigerator in a container. Should last at least a month.

OR you can parboil ribs, chicken, etc. IN the sauce, then use the remainder to brush on the cooking meat. However, if you par-cook any meat in the sauce, use it all up immediately on whatever you are cooking . . . once it is "contaminated" by the meat, do not save it.

Enjoy!

Ness - Lakeview, NY

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Baked Beans

Ingredients:

  • 1 can kidney beans (16 oz.)
  • 1 can butter beans (16 oz.)
  • 1 can lima beans (16 oz.)
  • 1 can pork and beans (16-20 oz.)
  • 10 slices chopped bacon
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 1/3 cup vinegar
  • 2/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. dry yellow mustard

Directions:

Drain all cans well. Brown bacon, drain all but 1 Tbsp. fat and save. Add onion and 1 Tbsp. fat and simmer. Mix vinegar, brown sugar, and mustard. Put beans in casserole. Mix bacon in. Pour vinegar mix over. Bake 45 minutes, covered, 350 degrees for 15 minutes uncovered. Serves 20

By Robin

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Grilled Iowa Chops

Ingredients:

  • Iowa chops or American chops (Pork) (for as many as are serving)
  • Sliced onion
  • Sliced green pepper
  • Favorite bacon
  • American cheese slices (optional)

Directions:

De-bone and trim Iowa chops first. Put a slice of onion on top of chop then one or two slices green pepper. Wrap one or two slices of bacon around everything and secure with toothpicks. Grill until done (slowly.) Before taking off grill you can add a slice of cheese if desired.

By Robin

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Barbeque Rub For Meat

I'm looking for a recipe for a dry barbeque rub to put on meats before cooking them, instead of drowning it bbq sauce.

Thanks,

momofrsd

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Quick Barbeque Sauce With Ketchup and Cola

For a quick BBQ sauce mix one cup of ketchup with one cup of a cola soda drink. Mix over medium heat till thickened. Can double and triple this recipe. I usually put chicken breasts in the crock pot and let them cook till done, then drain the liquid off and pour the sauce in to coat the chicken just before serving. Can also grill or bake in the oven with this.

By Melanie

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Southern Barbecue Sauce

A great sauce for cooking ribs, or grilling chicken and poultry.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups tomato ketchup
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil, safflower or peanut
  • 1/3 cup Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons mild mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 1/2 lemons, just need the juice
  • 1 to 2 fresh red chilies, very finely chopped

Directions:

Combine all the ingredients into a medium sauce pan on medium heat. Bring sauce to a boil and then reduce to low heat, cover, and allow to simmer for 20 minutes.

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Barbequed Spareribs

Brown:

  • 1 1/2 - 2 lb cut up spare ribs and put in a pot to keep warm

Saute in butter:

  • 1/4 cup chopped onions
  • 1 large celery stick - chopped

Add:

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 1/4 tsp dry mustard
  • 1 tbsp Worchestershire sauce
  • 1 tbsp vinegar
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • Salt to taste
  • Dash of cayenne
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar

Cook 5-10 minutes then pour over spareribs in saucepan.

Simmer approximately 1 hour. Serve with rice.

I often double the sauce since it's so good on rice that we eat a lot of it!

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Baked Beans Hawaiian

  • 1 - 19 oz can crushed pineapple
  • 2 - 14 oz cans beans in tomato sauce
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp dry mustard
  • 1/3 cup ketchup

Mix in a casserole. Bake @ 350F for 60 minutes. Makes 6-8 servings. Perfect for a summer barbeque.

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Stay Cool: Cook Corn and Kabobs Outside

Get into the habit of grilling outside. Grilled meat and vegetables taste fantastic when prepared well and you keep the heat outside.

Grilled Corn on the Cob

Pull husks away from corn but leave husks attached. Remove silks and then push the husks back over the corn. You can tie the end of the husks to keep them in place over the corn. Soak corn in cold water for 30 minutes. Then place on a preheated grill for 20 to 25 minutes on medium heat.

Chicken Teriyaki Kabobs

A tasty recipe to make outdoors.

Ingredients:

- 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes
- 1 cup Teriyaki Marinade
- 1/2 teaspoon Pepper
- 1/2 teaspoon Garlic Powder
- 1 small red onion, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
- 2 medium zucchini, cut into 1/2-inch slices
- 1 medium green bell pepper, cut into 1-inch squares
- Wooden skewers

Directions:

Combine the chicken and 3/4 cup Teriyaki Marinade into a ziplock bag or sealable container. Let sit in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. Then remove the chicken and discard the marinade. Sprinkle the pepper and garlic powder onto the chicken. Then put together your kababs, alternating ingredients. Grill for 10 minutes on each side or until chicken is thoroughly cooked. Use the remaining 1/4 cup Teriyaki Marinade to baste the kabobs as they cook.

Do you have any grilling tips or ideas?

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Barbequed Chicken Thighs

This is a very inexpensive recipe since it calls for making your own BBQ sauce and uses chicken thighs. It's also tasty.

Ingredients:

  • 8 chicken thighs
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon minced onions
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400F. Cover the bottom of a large baking sheet with foil and place the chicken pieces on the foil. Mix together ketchup, brown sugar, cider vinegar, onions, garlic and hot pepper sauce. Spoon two-thirds of the sauce onto the chicken pieces. Bake for 30 minutes or until done. Base the chicken pieces with the remaining suace every 5 to 10 minutes.

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A HILL OF BEANS - BAKED BEANS THAT IS
By Arleen M. Kaptur

The ole West loved them and movies depicted hungry cowpokes enjoying them over an open campfire. No barbecue is complete without them and kids enjoy them, not even knowing they are nutritious as well. So, don't let another outdoor cooking opportunity pass by without Baked Beans.

Everyone has a favorite family recipe or two handed down - keep that great tradition going. There is nothing wrong with trying new recipes, however, or transforming your own favorite into a tradition.

Old-Fashioned Beans

  • 1 lb. pea or navy beans
  • water
  • 2 tsp. dry mustard
  • dash of pepper
  • 1 tbs. salt
  • 3 onions, chopped
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 2 tbs. sweet pickle juice
  • 1/4 lb. salt pork

Wash and clean the beans. Cover with water and soak overnight. Drain. Add 2 cups water, mustard, pepper, salt, onions, brown sugar, molasses, pickle juice. Boil, covered, for about 1-1/2 hours. Beans should be wrinkled.

Heat oven to 250. Cut salt pork into 1/2" cubes. Place in 2-quart bean pot. Cover with hot beans and their liquid. Sprinkle with pepper. Bake 8 hours, covered, until very tender. When beans are baking for 6 hours, add about 3/4 cup water or just enough water to cover. Uncover the pot the last 1/2 hour. Old-fashioned flavor and worth the wait.


Boston Baked Beans

  • 2 cups navy beans, white beans or Great Northernbeans
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 lb. salt pork
  • 2 tsp. dry mustard,
  • 5 tbs. dark-brown sugar
  • 4 tbs. molasses

Wash the beans thoroughly. Soak overnight in water to cover.

Add salt, stir and drain, reserving the liquid. Preheat the oven to 350. Cut off a third of the salt pork and place it on the bottom of the bean pot. Add the beans. Blend the mustard, brown sugar, and molasses with the reserved bean liquid and pour over the beans.

Cover and bake for 6-1/2 hours, adding water as needed. Uncover for the final hour of cooking. Taste and add salt, if desired. You don't have to live in Boston to enjoy these beans!


Easy Beans

  • 6 slices bacon, cut into small pieces
  • 3 1-lb. cans baked beans
  • 1 8-oz. can tomato sauce
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup catsup
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tbs. prepared mustard,
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 5 drops bottled hot pepper sauce

Cook bacon until crisp. Drain. Combine with beans. Add tomato sauce, onion, catsup, brown sugar, mustard, salt, and hot pepper sauce. Preheat oven to 300. Bake, uncovered, in beanpot for 4-1/2 hours.

Some like it hot! Adjust that hot sauce to your liking.


Lazy Beans

  • 4 slices bacon, cut into small pieces
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 2 1-lb. cans pork and beans
  • 2 tbs. brown sugar
  • 1-1/2 tbs. Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tsp. prepared mustard

Cook bacon until crisp and drain. Reserve 1-1/2 tbs. of the drippings. Crumble bacon. Cook onion in the reserved drippings until tender, but not brown. Add to remaining ingredients, blending well. Place in casserole. Bake, uncovered on grill, with hood down, for 2 to 2-1/2 hours.

Enjoy the outdoors while these beans are slowly simmering on your grill.


Out on the Range Beans

  • 1 32-oz. can baked beans
  • 1 cup beer
  • 1/2 cup very strong brewed coffee
  • 3/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup chopped tomato
  • 4 hot dogs cut into 1/2" pieces
  • 1 tbs. horseradish
  • 1/2 cup molasses
  • 1/2 cup barbecue sauce

Blend all ingredients together. Place in oven-proof casserole. Bake at 300 for approximately 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Add additional beer if beans seem to be drying out.

Great served at a campsite with all your other camping food.


Quick Beans

  • 4 cans (16 ozs. each) baked beans, drained
  • 1-1/2 onions, chopped very fine
  • 1 lb. bacon, diced, cooked, and drained
  • 1 bottle (12 ozs.) chili sauce
  • 2 cups packed brown sugar

Combine all the ingredients. blend well and place in beanpot or casserole dish. Bake, uncovered (350) for 1 hour.

There's nothing wrong with "quick" on a hot, summer day.


Slow Cooker Beans

  • 1 can (16 ozs.) dark kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 can (16 ozs.) light kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 can (16 ozs.) pinto beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (15 ozs.) can unsalted diced tomatoes
  • 2 green peppers, cut into strips
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 tsp. oregano leaves, crushed
  • 1/2 tsp. ground cumin
  • 1 tsp. sage
  • 1/2 tsp. black pepper
  • water

Combine all the ingredients in a slow cooker. Add water to cover the beans. Cook on HIGH for 6-7 hours.

No heating up the kitchen - let your slow cooker do all the work.


Baked beans are a welcome addition to any outdoor meal. Serve them and see all the faces light up. Beans are a treat and healthy! Now that's quite a bargain! ENJOY!

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